Council Updates Podcast #002 – Christmas Distribution, Health Fair, Goldstream Fishing Season

Greetings and welcome to episode #2 of the Council Updates Podcast! In this episode, we speak with Chief George Harry, Councillor Cindy Harry and Councillor Gordon Harry about the Christmas Distribution. Cindy announces the upcoming health fair, George tells us about the latest fishing season at Goldstream and his plans to start a hunting group!

Listen to the podcast here:

Christmas Distribution Application Form

Malahat Health Fair:
11am – 4pm, Saturday, November 13th
Masks and Vaccine Passports Required
At the Multipurpose Centre

To stay on top of events happening at Malahat, please check out our community event calendar: https://malahatnation.com/members/calendar/

Thank you to Wes and Jeff Edwards for the music in this episode! If you’d like to have your music featured in a future episode, please message us on Facebook or send an email to communications@malahatnation.com.

Subscribe to future episodes:

Application for Malahat Distribution

Please fill out a separate form for each individual you are applying on behalf of. Legal custody documents or current years child tax statements MUST be provided to resolve eligibility for dependants.

All information contained on this form is held securely on Malahat Nation land and is only visible to authorized Malahat personnel. This information will only be used for the purposes of Per Capita Distribution and maintaining accurate membership records.

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Council Updates Podcast – First Episode, Introductions, Malahat Skywalk, Hunting & Fishing Groups

Greetings and welcome to the first episode of the Malahat Nation Chief and Council Podcast! In this episode, we speak with Chief George Harry and Councillor Cindy Harry about what they hope to acheive with this new podcast. We also cover topics covering Malahat Skywalk, Hunting & Fishing Groups, Mental Health and more!

Listen to the podcast here:

Cindy’s addictions awareness video

Men’s Group:
10am – 12pm, every Tuesday
Meet at the Boat Shed next to Community Garden

Women’s Group:
10am-12pm, every Wednesday
Meet at Fire Circle outside Kwunew Kwasun

Thank you to Wes and Jeff Edwards for the music in this episode!

Subscribe to future episodes:

Business Park Logo Contest

The Malahat Economic Development department is holding a logo contest!

With the development of Malahat Innovation Park, many new Malahat businesses will be needing logos! We want to put out the call to all Indigenous artists who would like to try their hand at designing a logo. The first two logos needed are for the business park itself (Malahat Innovation Park), and for the Malahat Film Studio.

If your design is chosen for either of these logos, you will win a $500 VISA gift card! In addition, your design will be automatically entered into any future logo design contests. If your logo is used at any time in the future, you will win the $500 gift card. All submissions will be entered into a draw for a $250 VISA gift card!

Submissions can be dropped off at the Malahat Band Office front desk, or emailed to dan.pasmans@malahatnation.com. Please include a name and description for your submission along with your contact info.

Please see the poster below for additional contest information!

August 2021

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/news/2021-08.pdf
Posted in The Malahat News

Solar System Monitoring

Malahat Nation’s solar system was completed in February 2020. It is a 50KW photovoltaic system consisting of 222 individual panels spread out across two buildings. Funding for this system was provided from the Government of BC as a part of their CleanBC initiative. A display monitor is programmed to present up-to-the-minute details on the systems output and historical power production. The same monitoring interface can be accessed online here.

Posted in Environment

Comprehensive Community Plan

The Malahat Nation updated its Comprehensive Community Plan in 2021 with the goal of making it an overarching plan that guides all of our planning and decision-making on reserve for the decades to come.

The Malahat Nation CCP is an overarching plan that guides our journey to self-government. This document takes a holistic look at the Malahat community and examines all aspects that form Malahat’s future. This is a plan driven and owned by all community members. It identifies key values and objectives that guide the Nation’s future planning and decision-making. Associated action ideas are also identified to achieve these objectives successfully.

7 values of Malahat were identified from substantial community input:

  • Community Growth
  • Community Services
  • Community Unity
  • Cultural Continuity
  • Cultural Respect
  • Empowerment and Leadership
  • Government Transparency

View Malahat Nation CCP

For any questions about Malahat Nation CCP, please contact:

Cliff Feng

Community Planning Coordinator

Phone: (250) 929-1290 Ext. 124

Email: cliff.feng@malahatnation.com

Posted in Planning

Environmental Review Policy

1. Policy

It is Council's policy that all appropriate protective measures be taken to protect the lands of Malahat Nation

2. Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that projects that require the exercise of a power or performance of a duty or function by Malahat Nation Council are considered in a careful and precautionary manner to avoid significant adverse environmental effects on Malahat lands and resources.

Until Malahat Nation enacts its own Environmental Assessment Law pursuant to the Malahat Nation Land Code, this policy must be consulted each time Council takes action or makes a decision within the scope of the Malahat Nation Land Code that may have an effect on the environment.

3. Scope

This Policy applies to any and all projects and designated projects that have the potential to adversely affect Malahat Nation land.

4. Definitions

Applicant: A person or entity, including Malahat Nation departments, that proposes to carry out projects on IR 11.

Designated Projects: Physical activities that are listed in the Impact Assessment Act Physical Activities Regulations. These are generally larger scale projects known to be likely to result in adverse environmental effects.

Effects: unless the context requires otherwise, changes to the environment or to health, social or economic conditions and the positive and negative consequences of these changes;

Environment: The components of the Earth including:

a. land, water and air, including all layers of the atmosphere;

b. all organic and inorganic matter and living organisms; and

c. the interacting natural systems that include components referred to in paragraphs a and b;

Environmental Review: a review of a project or designated project to determine its potential environmental effects;

Exemption List: the list, set out in Appendix A of this Policy, of those projects that are not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects and therefore exempted from environmental screening requirements;

Project: A physical activity that is carried out on Malahat Nation IR 11 lands in relation to a physical work and is not a designated project.

Qualified Environmental Professional: an individual who carries out a part of an assessment under this policy and is:

a. acting within the individual’s area of expertise, and in accordance with the code of ethics for the applicable regulatory body for that individual’s profession; and

b. a member in good standing of the applicable regulatory body for any of the following professionals:

  1. an agrologist;
  2. an applied science technologist or certified technician;
  3. a registered professional biologist or registered biology technologist;
  4. a professional engineer or professional engineering licensee;
  5. a professional forester or registered forest technologist; or
  6. a professional geoscientist or professional geoscience licensee.

5. Regulatory Context

a. The provisions in Annex F of Malahat Nation’s Individual Agreement with Canada set out the environmental assessment process that will apply to Malahat Nation Land until the enactment and coming into force of First Nation Laws on the subject.

b. Pursuant to the Individual Agreement, Malahat will conduct an assessment process in respect of every project on First Nation Land that is consistent with federal environmental and impact assessment legislation. This means that Malahat Nation will not carry out the project on First Nation land, or exercise any power or perform any duty or function conferred on it under the Malahat Nation Land Code or a First Nation law that would permit the project to be carried out, in whole or in part, on First nation Land, unless the Council of the First Nation determines that the carrying out of the project:

  1. is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects; or
  2. is likely to cause significant environmental effects, but those effects are justifiable in the circumstances.

c. In this policy, environmental effects include:

  1. a change to the environment that would occur on Malahat IR 11;
  2. with respect to the Indigenous peoples, an effect – occurring on Malahat IR 11 and resulting from any change to the environment – on

i. physical and cultural heritage;

ii. the current use of lands and resources for traditional purposes; or

iii. any structure, site or thing that is of historical, archaeological, paleontological or architectural significance; and

  1. a change occurring to the health, social, or economic conditions of indigenous peoples.

6. Roles and Responsibilities

6.1 Chief and Council

(a) Chief and Council must decide whether a project or designated project, taking into account the implementation of any mitigation measures they consider appropriate:

  1. is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects;
  2. is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects; or
  3. is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects, and those effects are justified in the circumstances.

(b) Chief and Council must make the decision under paragraph 7 prior to exercising any duty or power under the Malahat Nation Land Code that would allow the project or designated project to proceed.

6.2 Lands Department

The Lands Manager must:

a. determine whether a proposed activity is a project (or a designated project) requiring an environmental review in accordance with this policy;

b. provide an Applicant written notice that an environmental review is required;

c. identify any additional information required to complete the environmental review;

d. make recommendations to Council to aid the determination of the likelihood and significance of environmental effects, and whether any environmental effects of the project can be adequately mitigated.

6.3 Applicant

The Applicant must:

a. provide the information requested pursuant to an environmental review to the Lands Department well in advance of the proposed project start date to allow sufficient time for review

b. pay any costs associated with an environmental review or assessment, including the retention of qualified environmental professional and where required by the Lands Department, the reasonable costs of an independent review of a screening report under this section;

c. follow all recommendations, conditions, and/or criteria provided by Council in the Land Use Application Review with respect to the proposed project.

Where an Environmental Review is deemed necessary under this policy, the Applicant must not proceed with any aspect of the project on Malahat Nation lands that would have an effect on the environment, unless:

a. an environmental review has been completed;

b. Council has passed a Band Council Resolution stating that:

  1. the project is unlikely to cause any significant adverse environmental effects, or

  2. the project is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects, but those effects are justifiable in the circumstances; and

c. the applicant agrees to comply with any conditions set by Council that relate to mitigating measures.

7. Procedures

7.1 Delegation of Responsibility

(a) No responsibilities outlined in this document may be delegated.

7.2 Environmental Review process

  1. The Applicant submits a Land Use Application form to the Malahat Nation Lands Department. Lands Department Review

  2. Malahat Nation Lands Department makes a determination as to whether the proposed use is either a project or a designated project.

  3. If it is a designated project, the Malahat Nation Lands Department will work with the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada to determine an appropriate environmental assessment process consistent with federal legislation.

  4. If it is a project, Malahat Nation Lands Department will determine whether the project is included in the Exemption List.

  5. If the project does not fall under the Exemption List an environmental screening report is required.

  6. If an environmental screening is required, an environmental screening report must be prepared by a qualified environmental professional at the Applicant’s expense and submitted to the Lands Department for review.

  7. Information requirements for an environmental screening report are listed in Appendix B.

  8. Where an environmental screening report is submitted, it may be reviewed by an independent qualified environmental professional at the discretion of the Lands Department and at the Applicant’s reasonable cost.

  9. The Lands Department will provide Council with copies of the environmental screening report and make recommendations as to the likelihood and significance of adverse environmental effects.

  10. Council will review the available information, including the environmental effects of the proposed project, and make a determination under paragraph 5.

  11. Where Council determines that a proposed project may proceed, prior to exercising any duty or authority under the Malahat Nation Land Code, Council will identify any required follow up or mitigation measures in writing.

8. References and Related Authorities

• Malahat Nation Land Code

• Sections 23, 25, 26 and 27 of the Framework Agreement;

• Section 8.1 and Annex “F” of the Malahat Nation Individual Agreement;

• Impact Assessment Act Canadian Environmental Assessment Act S.C. 2019, c. 28, s. 1 and its Regulations; and

• Paragraphs 6(3)(c), 20(1)(b) and 20(2)(c), and Sections 21 and 40 of the First Nations Land Management Act

APPENDIX A

PROJECT EXEMPTION LIST TO ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS:

  1. The Malahat Nation Council is of the opinion that the carrying out of a project that meets the following criteria will not cause significant adverse environmental effects:

  2. Administrative actions that will not, or do not affect Malahat lands or resources (i.e., transfer or extension of a lease, permit or other interest that will not result in any physical changes to a previously approved project or activity occurring on the land);

  3. Emergency repairs or actions needed on an urgent basis to avoid or respond to emergencies;

  4. Responses to accidents or threats to public health;

  5. Projects that fall under "SCHEDULE 1" of the Designated Classes of Projects Order of the Impact Assessment Act, SC 2019, c 28, s 1 and as set out below.

  6. The exemption list below does not include projects:

    a. that cause a change to >>i. any characteristic of a water body, >>ii. migratory birds or nests, as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, >>iii. wildlife species, as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Species at Risk Act that are listed in Schedule 1 of that Act, or >>iv. residences or critical habitats, as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Species at Risk Act, of wildlife species referred to in subparagraph (iii);

b. that involve an activity referred to in subsection 5(1) of the Canadian Navigable Waters Act, subsection 35(1) or 36(3) of the Fisheries Act, or subsection 3(1) of the Wildlife Area Regulations c. that involve the removal of any structure or resource that is of historical, archaeological, paleontological or architectural significance; or d. that cause damage to any structure, resource or site that is of historical, archaeological, paleontological or architectural significance.

SCHEDULE 1:

PART 1: General

  1. The operation, maintenance or repair of a physical work.

  2. Physical activities that are carried out entirely within the interior of a building.

  3. (1) The construction or operation of a well to conduct geotechnical or environmental investigations of the subsurface characteristics of a site for the purpose of scientific research or of assessing or monitoring the site for contamination.

(2) The decommissioning of a well that was used to conduct a geotechnical or environmental investigation referred to in subsection (1).

(3) The classes of projects described in subsections (1) and (2) do not include projects that involve the placement of temporary or permanent fill in a water body.

PART 2: Buildings

4 (1) On developed land, the construction, installation, operation, modification, demolition, decomissioning, removal or replacement of a building that has a footprint of no more than 1 000 m2.

(2) On developed land, the expansion of a building that does not increase the building's footprint to more than 1 000 m2.

(3) On land other than developed land, the construction or installation of a building that has a footprint of no more than 100 m2.

(4) The classes of projects described in subsections (1) to (3) do not include projects that

(a) involve the placement of temporary or permanent fill in a water body;

(b) involve the disturbance of known or suspected subsurface contamination; or

(c) involve the demolition of a building that is less than 30 m from a school, hospital or residential building.

PART 3: Physical Works Related to Building or Other Structure

5 (1) On developed lands, the construction, installation, operation, modification, expansion, replacement, removal or decommissioning of any of the following physical works that are related to a building or other structure and that have a footprint, when combined with the footprint of all other physical works related to the building or structure, of no more than 1 000 m2:

(a) lighting systems;

(b) signage;

(c) fire suppression infrastructure;

(d) parking lots;

(e) paved areas;

(f) charging stations for electrical vehicles;

(g) infrastructure that generates solar or wind power;

(h) fencing that does not prevent the passage of wild animals; and

(i) sidewalks, boardwalks, paths, pedestrian ramps or access roads.

(2) The classes of projects described in subsection (1) do not include projects that

(a) involve the placement of temporary or permanent fill in a water body; or

(b) involve the disturbance of known or suspected subsurface contamination.

6 (1) On lands other than developed lands, the construction, installation, operation, modification, expansion, replacement, removal or decommissioning of any of the following physical works that are related to a building or other structure and that have a footprint, when combined with the footprint of all other physical works related to the building or structure, of no more than 100 m2:

(a) lighting systems;

(b) signage;

(c) fire suppression infrastructure;

(d) parking lots;

(e) paved areas;

(f) charging stations for electrical vehicles;

(g) infrastructure that generates solar or wind power;

(h) fencing that does not prevent the passage of wild animals; and

(i) sidewalks, boardwalks, paths, pedestrian ramps or access roads.

(2) The classes of projects described in subsection (1) do not include projects that

(a) involve the placement of temporary or permanent fill in a water body; or

(b) involve the disturbance of known or suspected subsurface contamination.

PART 4: Utility Infrastructure

7 (1) The installation, operation, replacement, modification, decommissioning, abandonment or removal of a hydrant or hook-up that is part of a utility distribution system for a municipality or farm.

(2) The construction, installation, operation, replacement, modification, expansion, removal or decommissioning of water-related utility infrastructure, other than water pipelines, that has a footprint of no more than 100 m2.

(3) The construction, installation, operation, replacement, modification, expansion, removal or decommissioning of water pipelines that are

(a) no more than 100 m in length; or

(b) located underneath, or on developed land that is alongside and contiguous to, a railway or road.

(4) The modification of a water treatment facility.

(5) The construction, installation, operation, replacement, modification, expansion or abandonment of a portion of any of the following physical works that is located more than 30 m from a water body and are underneath, or on developed land that is alongside and contiguous to, a railway or road:

(a) sewers;

(b) drains;

(c) steam lines;

(d) service tunnels; and

(e) overhead or underground telecommunication lines.

(6) The classes of projects described in subsections (1) to (5) do not include projects that

(a) involve the placement of temporary or permanent fill in a water body;

(b) involve the crossing of a water body, other than an overhead crossing by a telecommunication line; or

(c) involve the disturbance of known or suspected subsurface contamination.

PART 5: Above Ground Storage Tank Systems

8 (1) The installation, replacement, operation, modification, expansion or removal of an above ground storage tank system for petroleum products or allied petroleum products that is

(a) located within an airport and has an aggregate capacity of no more than 30 000 L; or

(b) located outside of an airport and has an aggregate capacity of no more than 5 000 L.

(2) The classes of projects described in subsection (1) do not include projects that involve the disturbance of known or suspected subsurface contamination.

APPENDIX B

Malahat Nation Land Code – Form No. 7

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REPORT INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS

1. PROJECT INFORMATION
Project title and proponent contact details
Proposed start and expected completion date of the project and describe all components of the project over the entire life cycle of the project, including site preparation, construction, operation, decommissioning, and site restoration or rehabilitation.
Any physical works or activities accessory to the principle project (for example, if the project creates waste, include information on the proper disposal of that waste; or if certain utilities need to be established or decommissioned for the project, include those ancillary works).
Identify all permits, licences or approvals (including any provincial or municipal requirements when applicable) that need to be obtained for the project and any other important characteristics of the regulatory environment:
Attach maps of the area, showing the project location in relation to existing activities, topographic features, watercourses and water bodies
Attach copies of drawings, plans, maps showing the project location and any key features referred to in the remainder of the document.
2. LAND DESCRIPTION
All surface water bodies (lakes, rivers, streams, wetlands, bogs, etc.) in or within 30 m of the study area.
Identify all drinking water wells or aquifer recharge zones (i.e., a land area into which water can infiltrate into and replenish an aquifer relatively easily) and the depth to groundwater, if known.
Soil type and topography, slope and any special landforms within the specified project area
Describe the land use (e.g., zoning, current and past land uses and ownership) at the project site and any existing and planned resource use within the boundaries or surrounding areas of the site that may be affected by the proposed project (e.g., farming, forestry, mining, commercial fisheries, wildlife populations and/or distribution, trapping/hunting, location of traditional plants, water resources)
3. FLORA AND FAUNA
Identify any plant and animal species that are listed under the federal Species At Risk Act that have the potential to be present in the project area (the Species At Risk registry managed by Environment Canada provides information on listed species at risk and their habitat.).
Identify any migratory birds – as populations and as individuals – and their habitats, eggs and nests that have the potential to be present in the project area.
If the project involves in-water works or is sited near water, identify any fish species that have the potential to be present in the project area and identify the type and location of fish habitat.
Describe the vegetation in the area (such as forests, marshes, grass fields, cultivated fields) as well as in the adjacent areas.
Describe animals in the area (aquatic species, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals) as well as in the adjacent areas.
Identify any significant sensitive natural areas (e.g., wetlands, overwintering or calving areas, spawning grounds, etc.) in the project area.
4. Traditional/Cultural Uses
Identify any traditional, historical, archeological and/or cultural use areas in the project area.
5. Environmental Effects
Indicate any potential effects from the project to:
Surface and groundwater quality, flow, or movement; any resulting sedimentation or erosion; and any pollution from operations or accidental spills.
The land surface (e.g., clearing of trees, shrubs, or ground vegetation), any unique and sensitive features (e.g., wetland or park), or adjacent properties
Any plant or animal species, including those listed under the federal Species At Risk Act that have the potential to be affected in the project area
Any migratory birds – as populations and individuals – or their habitats, eggs and nests
Any fish or fish habitat
Air quality (from chemical emissions or dust/odours) and on noise-sensitive receptors (e.g., schools, daycares, nursing homes, residences, places of worship, hospitals, etc.)
Any potential concerns that the project may raise in the community or general public (e.g., effects on local businesses, institutions/public facilities, physical or cultural heritage resources, or the current use of lands and resources for Malahat traditional purposes).
Identify if the project has the potential to result in the creation of waste material requiring disposal (such as oil products for machinery, treated wood, lead paint, etc.), involves the installation of a fuel tank over 230 L, or requires the use of soil or material (e.g. sand, gravel, or rocks).
If the fish, fish habitat, aquatic species listed under the Species At Risk Act or migratory birds are likely to be present in the project area, include a plain language professional opinion (maximum 3,000 words) regarding the potential changes and the likelihood that those changes will occur as a result of the project to:
   a. fish and fish habitat as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Fisheries Act,
   b. aquatic species as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Species at Risk Act,
   c. migratory birds as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994
6. Mitigation Measures
If any potential effects are identified, list applicable mitigation measures proposed to be implemented during the life of the project to minimize or avoid those effects:
   a. Contact Environment Canada for guidance on appropriate mitigation measures for impacts to migratory birds, such as timing restrictions
   b. Contact the Department of Fisheries and Oceans for advice on appropriate mitigation measures and/or Fisheries Act authorizations. Authorizations may also be required if the project involves blasting in or near water, killing fish by means other than fishing, or creating a barrier to fish migration. Environment Canada is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act which prohibit the deposit of deleterious (harmful) substances to water containing fish.
7. Comments and Other Information
Provide any other information you feel is pertinent for the Lands Department to know about the project.
Identify any key best practices or mitigation measures not otherwise listed above that you plan to implement during the project.
Provide a list of any supporting documentation (copies of permits, reports, etc) that may substantiate your information and be useful for the Malahat Nation Lands Department during their review.
The applicant and the qualified environmental professional preparing the report must provide signatures and commit to the implementing the mitigation measures stated. Malahat Nation will make its determination of environmental effects based on these measures. Further information may be sought from the applicant by Malahat Nation if needed to support the determination of environmental effects.

Posted in Laws & Policies

20/21 Audited Financial Statements

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/finance/20-21-consolidated-financial-statements.pdf
Posted in Finance

Housing Policy

Versions

Current Version 1.6
Policy# GOV-009
BCR# 2020/21-036
Effective Date: January 28, 2021
Original Version 1.0
Policy# GOV-009
BCR#
Effective Date: August 11, 2014

Glossary of Terms

When used in this Housing Policy the following definitions will apply to the following terms:

"Active Housing Application" means a Housing Application that was submitted to the Housing Department no more than a year ago and/or a Housing Application that has been updated in accordance with this Housing Policy.

"Additional Rent" means an amount of money paid, or required to be paid, by a Tenant to Malahat Nation for housing related expenses, services, fees, and/or penalties, including, but not limited to, fees charged for water and sewer services, garbage collection services, and penalties for failing to pay Rent on time.

"Applicant" means a person who is applying for the allocation of a Rental Unit using a Housing Application or a person who is applying to purchase, build or renovate a residential dwelling on Malahat Nation Lands using a Market Based Housing Application.

"Arrears" means any Rent or money which has become due and owed to the Malahat Nation or a financial institution, has not yet been received and for which no payment plan or Arrears Agreement has been negotiated.

"Arrears Agreement" means an agreement between a Tenant and Malahat Nation that stipulates the amount and due dates for Arrears payments as described in section 3.7 of this Policy.

"Authorized Occupant" means a person who is not a Tenant, but has been approved by the Landlord and designated as an Authorized Occupant in the Rental Agreement to occupy a residence beyond the limited terms permitted for a Guest.

"Borrower" means a Member or MN Owned Entity who enters into a loan or mortgage agreement with a financial institution under the Market Housing Program.

"CAO" means the Chief Administrative Officer and includes the Band Manager position whether under this title or any other, including CEO.

"CMHC" means the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

"Council" means the Chief and Councilors duly elected by the Malahat Nation members in accordance with the Indian Act or applicable election code.

"Default" means to commit a breach of a loan agreement with a financial institution or a Security Agreement with Malahat Nation, which entitles the lender or Malahat Nation to take enforcement action.

"Designated contact person" means the person designated by the housing department to be contacted in case of emergency. The name and contact information of this person will be provided to the Tenant.

"Eviction" means the action taken by Malahat Nation to remove a Tenant or person from a Nation-Owned House for failing to comply with this Policy and/or the conditions of their Rental Agreement or the action taken by Malahat Nation to regain possession of land and/or a home upon Default by a Borrower.

"Emergency Shelter" means housing that may be made available on a temporary basis as authorized by the CAO that may not offer all of the equipment, services, and occupancy latitude standard in permanent housing.

"FNMHF" means the First Nations Market Housing Fund.

"Force Majeure" means any act, event or cause, except in relation to obligations to make payments under this Agreement, beyond the reasonable control of the party affected by that force majeure including, without limitation, any act of God or any public enemy, fire, flood, explosion, landslide, natural disaster or epidemic.

"Guest" means a person who is neither a Tenant nor an Authorized Occupant, but is otherwise permitted to be present on Nation lands and may remain in accordance with this Housing Policy for a period of 20 days consecutively, or a maximum of 30 days in a six-month period.

"Homeowner" means a Member to whom possession of a house or other residential property on Malahat Nation Lands has been allotted by Council pursuant to a customary allotment.

"Household Composition" means the number of people in a household, their ages, genders and relationships.

"Housing Application" means an application for the allocation of a Rental Unit and which will be available upon request from the Housing Department.

"Housing Department" means the Housing Manager and the housing employees of the Malahat Nation who have been delegated authority by the Housing Manager to administer this Housing Policy and the Housing Programs.

"Household Income" means the whole and combined gross income or money received, of all members of the household.

"Housing Program" means the Rental Program, Shelter Allowance Program, Homeowner Program, Market Housing Program and any other housing program that is implemented in accordance with this Policy.

"Immediate Family" means spouses, parents, siblings and children.

"ISC" means Indigenous Services Canada, formerly Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, which itself was formerly Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

"Landlord" means Malahat Nation.

"Malahat Nation or MN" means the Indian "Band" as defined by the Indian Act and known as the Malahat Nation.

"Malahat Nation Lands" means reserve lands set apart for the use and benefit of the Malahat Nation.

"Member" means a member of the Malahat Nation whose name appears on or is eligible to appear on the Malahat Nation membership list.

"MN Owned Entity" means a corporation which is wholly owned by or on behalf of Malahat Nation.

"Mortgaged Rental Unit" means a Nation-Owned House that is no longer subject to a mortgage, was constructed and financed through the CMHC Section 95 program or bank financing, and is occupied by a Tenant.

"Nation-Owned House" means a house, or other residential property owned and administered by the Malahat Nation and includes, but is not limited to:

  • Rental Units; and
  • Mortgaged Rental Units.

"National Occupancy Standard" means the requirements set by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) to help determine the number of bedrooms a dwelling should have to provide freedom from crowding taking into account the number, age, sex and interrelationships of the household members:

The Canadian National Occupancy Standards states that:

  • no more than two people shall share a bedroom,
  • parents or couples may share a bedroom,
  • children under 5 years, either of the same sex or opposite sex may share a bedroom,
  • children under 18 years of the same sex may share a bedroom, and
  • a child aged 5 to 17 years should not share a bedroom with a child under 5 of the opposite sex.

"Housing Manager" means the Malahat Nation employee who has been delegated authority by the CAO to manage and implement this Housing Policy and to manage the day to day operations of the Housing Department and Housing Programs.

"Non-member" means a person who is not a member of Malahat Nation.

"Permanent Residence" means the residence which a person occupies on a year-round basis for the purposes of the Homeowner Program.

"Primary Residence" means the home which a person occupies the majority of the time.

"Primary Tenant" means the original signatory tenant in a subleasing context.

"Private Tenant" means a person who pays, or is required to pay, rent to a landlord Homeowner in return for the right to occupy a Privately-Owned Home.

"Privately Owned Home" means a house or other residential property on Malahat Nation Lands that a Member has been allotted by Council pursuant to a customary allotment.

"Proof of Income" is the requirement for the tenant to supply the Housing Department with documentation to verify annual income of the household, including T-4's, Revenue Canada Notice of Assessment (T451) or other documents that substantiate income from all sources.

"Rent" means an amount of money paid, or required to be paid, monthly by a Tenant to Malahat Nation in exchange for the right to occupy a Nation-Owned House, but does not include a security deposit, Arrears, or other debts owed by a Tenant to Malahat Nation in connection with the tenancy.

"Rental Agreement" means the written agreement between a Tenant and the Malahat Nation that confers on the Tenant a right to occupy a Rental Unit in exchange for the payment of Rent, and includes Sublease Agreements and any renewal of a Rental Agreement or Sublease Agreement.

"Rental Unit" means a Nation-Owned House that is available to be occupied by a Tenant under the terms of a Rental Agreement and in exchange for payment of Rent, and includes Mortgaged Rental Units.

"RRAP" means the Residential Rehabilitations Assistance Program which is administered by CMHC.

"Secondary Contact Person" means the person designated by the housing department to be contacted in case of emergency if the primary contact person is unavailable. The name and contact information of this person will be provided to the Tenant.

"Security Agreement" means the written agreement setting out the respective rights and obligations of Malahat Nation and the Borrower in respect of a First Nation loan guarantee under the Market Housing Program.

"Shelter Allowance" means financial assistance a Tenant receives or which Malahat Nation receives on a Tenants behalf to pay Rent and housing related expenses, including, but not limited to, housing related expenses that may be charged as Additional Rent by Malahat Nation.

"Spouse" means either of two (2) persons who are married to each other or who have lived with each other in a marriage-like relationship for a period of at least two (2) years and includes persons of the same gender.

"Sublease" means a temporary agreement made between a Tenant and a Member through which the Member assumes the rights and responsibilities of the Tenant in relation to a Rental Unit for a specified period of time.

"Sublease Agreement" means an agreement made between Malahat Nation and a Subtenant for the temporary use and occupancy of a Rental Unit for which there is a Rental Agreement in place between Malahat Nation and a primary Tenant.

"Subtenant" means a Member who agrees to Sublease a Rental Unit from a Tenant and enter into a Sublease Agreement with Malahat Nation.

"Tenant" means a person who enters into a Rental Agreement or Sublease Agreement with the Malahat Nation and pays Rent or who is required to pay Rent to Malahat Nation in return for the right to occupy a Nation-Owned House.

"Waiting List" means the list of Active Housing Applications on file with the Housing Department.

"Working days" mean Monday – Friday except for statutory holidays.

Any defined term will be read as having an appropriate corresponding meaning if referred to in the singular, plural, verb, or noun form.

Section 1.0 - Introduction

1.1 Mission Statement

Malahat Nation is committed to providing Members with options for safe, affordable and energy efficient housing in a manner that is unbiased, transparent and fair.

1.2 Revisions to Policy

This Housing Policy shall be reviewed and, if necessary, revised annually to ensure it is relevant and continues to meet the needs of the community.

1.3 Purpose

Malahat Nation has developed and adopted this Housing Policy for the effective management of on-reserve housing. Implementing a comprehensive Housing Policy provides Council and the Housing Department with a framework to deliver the Housing Program to all Malahat Nation Members reliably and consistently. It also enables the Malahat Nation to align policy and program delivery across departments for effective use of limited resources and to ensure the maintenance of rental houses.

1.4 Guiding Principles

In conjunction with Council, Members, and the Housing Department the following guiding principles have been established:

  • Council has delegated the authority of managing and implementing this Housing Policy and the Housing Programs to the Housing Manager;

  • Build and maintain safe, affordable and energy efficient housing for Malahat Nation Members;

  • Develop and implement an effective maintenance program to ensure a minimum level of health and safety;

  • Extend and maximize the useful life of existing Malahat Nation housing inventory;

  • Pursue alternative and creative housing opportunities so that a greater number of Malahat Nation Members have the opportunity to own a home;

1.5 Authority and Application

This Housing Policy is made under the authority of the Council.

This Housing Policy and the guidelines, procedures, policies and criteria it establishes apply to all houses (as identified in this Policy) on Malahat Nation Lands and to all housing services provided by the Housing Department.

Section 2.0 – Governance

2.1 Housing Department

The Housing Department, in cooperation and consultation with the Housing Manager, shall be responsible for the day to day operations, administration and management of this Housing Policy and the Housing Programs.

The Housing Department's office is located at 1121 Jesken Road, Mill Bay, BC.

Housing Department Roles and Responsibilities

Under the direction of, and in cooperation and consultation with, the Housing Manager, the Housing Department shall carry out the following functions:

  • prepare and present annual budgets to the Housing Manager;
  • ensure reports are prepared and presented to the Housing Manager and where required to Council;
  • advise the Housing Manager on the implications of any transaction or policy changes contemplated;
  • keep Council up-to-date on workshops, training, funding opportunities, and any relevant correspondence;
  • manage and carry out the day to day operations required to implement and oversee the Housing Program(s) and other related duties;
  • promote and manage the Housing Programs;
  • ensure adherence to all applicable building codes and guidelines (National Building Code, British Columba Building Code, Labor Code, Fire and Safety);
  • ensure inspections are performed by qualified inspectors on all work done on Nation-Owned Houses, before, during and after work is done;
  • accompany the qualified inspector(s) during all inspections of Nation-Owned Houses;
  • provide construction and renovation updates to the Council as needed or when requested;
  • accept and score Housing Applications and renovation applications for review;
  • allocate Rental Unit;
  • provide orientation to new Tenants;
  • maintain and update Tenant files, the Waiting List and renovation requests;
  • Coordinate with the Finance Department to collect Rent and issue receipts;
  • ensure monthly Rent payments from income/social assistance and payroll are being made;
  • maintain a database on all housing accounts;
  • provide an Arrears report to Council when requested;
  • implement the Arrears Management Plan of this Housing Policy;
  • provide Tenant counseling as required;
  • enter into Arrears Agreements with Tenants as required; and
  • prepare and deliver all notices, including Arrears and Eviction notices.

Section 3.0 – Rental Program

3.1 Posting Rental Vacancies

When a rental unit becomes available, the Housing Department shall post an announcement on MalahatNation.com and Malahat Nation's Facebook page, which shall be visible for a minimum period of 90 days before the unit is allocated. If there are extenuating circumstances that require a truncated posting period, the CAO may authorize an expedited process.

3.2 Application Requirements

The following requirements must be met by Applicants who wish to be considered for allocation of a Rental Unit. If any of these requirements are not met, the Housing Department: shall not accept the Housing Application and shall advise the applicant that the application requirements were not met.

Housing Application Form

In order to be considered for allocation of a Rental Unit, the Applicant must submit a completed Housing Application to the Housing Department that includes:

  • Written consent from the Applicant to speak to the references and verify employment and/or financial information submitted in support of the Housing Application.

Housing Applications on file with the Housing Department must be updated by the Applicant on an annual basis and whenever there is a change to the information contained in the Housing Application in order to remain on the Waiting List.

Applicants receiving Shelter Allowance must provide proof of income or some other form of income/social assistance & must maintain an up-to-date file with the Band Social Development Worker in the Community Programs Department.

In shared parenting time arrangements, written proof must be provided to the Housing Department demonstrating said arrangements. This can be provided by either the guardians or parents but is necessary before evaluating the housing application.

Membership and Age Requirement

To submit a Housing Application for the allocation of a Rental Unit, the Applicant must be: a Member or a Non-member with primary care of a minor Member child and provide their status number; and eighteen (18) years of age or older, unless there are extenuating circumstances. Some of the extenuating circumstances that may be taken into account when deciding whether to accept a Housing Application from an Applicant who is under the age of eighteen (18) are:

  • health or safety issues affecting the Applicant and/or any dependents;
  • overcrowding in the Applicant's current residence;
  • accessibility;
  • family violence;
  • child welfare;
  • the fact the Applicant has withdrawn from parental control;
  • marital breakdown and/or changes in the Applicant's marital status;
  • the fact the Applicant's current residence was destroyed or rendered uninhabitable by fire or as another consequence of circumstances of Force Majeure
  • Force Majeure

Income Requirement

The Applicant must provide evidence of sufficient income to support the Rent payable, such as pay stubs, training allowance, or income/social assistance documents, or a letter of employment.

Arrears and Rental History

Applicants must be in good standing with Malahat Nation to be eligible for a rental unit. Good standing means that any Arrears are paid in full or an Arrears Agreement has been created between the Tenant and the Housing Department.

If the Applicant was previously Evicted from a Nation-Owned Home, Malahat Nation and the Housing Department reserve the right to reject the Applicant's Housing Application for this reason. The Housing Department shall act in the best interest of the Nation when considering this circumstance.

If the Applicant previously caused damage to a Nation-Owned home, Malahat Nation and the Housing Department reserves the right to require a damage deposit exceeding one month's rent to protect the Nation's housing stock.

Safety, Overcrowding, and Medical Issue Considerations

Due to capacity issues, the Scoring Application Guide will be used to ensure that Applicants who do not already have access to safe housing will be given priority in housing allocations.

Changes to Household Composition

Rental Unit allocations are decided based on the information in Housing Applications, including information on Household Composition. If there are changes to Household Composition after an allocation is made, the Housing Department may reassess the allocation. If it is determined that the allocation is no longer appropriate because of changes to the Household Composition, the Rental Agreement may be terminated in accordance with its terms and if the Tenant submits a new Housing Application it will be placed on the Waiting List.

If the Housing Department determines that a Tenant intentionally provided untrue or inaccurate information about Household Composition on the Housing Application, and the allocation has already been made, the Tenant may be Evicted.

Incomplete Applications

If applications are found to be incomplete, the housing department will do as follows:

  1. Contact the applicant at least 3 (three) times to give them a chance to complete the application and;
  2. Send a letter to their listed address notifying including contact information and in-person office hours.

3.3 Criteria for Deciding Rental Unit Allocations

Providing safe, affordable and energy efficient housing for all Members is a priority for Malahat Nation. Unfortunately, the need for Rental Units often exceeds capacity and available funding.

A completed Housing Application will include the information needed to score the Housing Application in accordance with the Application Scoring Guide. The Application Scoring Guide provides an unbiased assessment of the Applicant's current living conditions, affordability analysis (ability to pay utilities and rent) and confirmation of Household Composition.

The size of unit considered for each application will be based upon the number of bedrooms required stated on the housing application by the applicant. It is the applicant's responsibility to request the number of bedrooms in accordance with the National Occupancy Standard.

If the number of bedrooms requested are not in accordance with the National Occupancy Standard applicants must provide the housing department with information explaining the extenuating circumstances that support their request. It is the responsibility of the applicant to update the housing department if the number of occupants that they wish to reside in their unit changes from what they have stated on their application.

Deviations from the National Occupancy Standard will only be made when the Housing Department has determined that the occupants will remain in a safe living situation. Any deviations from the National Occupancy Standards are required to be approved in writing by the CAO.

To provide a fair and transparent method for allocating Rental Units and to ensure that Rental Units are allocated to Applicants on the basis of relative merit and in accordance with the community's housing goals and this Housing Policy, the following procedure will be followed:

  • Completed Housing Applications must be submitted to the Housing Department by the Applicant and must be updated by the Applicant on an annual basis to remain on the Waiting List;
  • The Housing Department will score each completed Housing Application it receives using the Application Scoring Guide; and
  • When a Rental Unit becomes available, the Housing Manager will allocate Rental Units on the verified scores of Active Housing Applications and, if necessary, the Household Composition of eligible Applicants.

When reviewing scores and making recommendations for allocations, The Housing Manager must follow the conflict of interest guidelines.

If two Housing Applications receive the same score and the Household Compositions of each Applicant are equally suited to the available Rental Unit, the tie maybe broken by who applied first according to the dates recorded on the Housing Applications.

Once the housing department has evaluated all relevant applications, The Allocation Review form will be filled out summarizing the process and recommending to the CAO a specific allocation. Upon review that the process was properly followed, the CAO may then affirm the designation by signing the Allocation Review. At this point the home will be allocated to the appropriate applicant and the Housing Manager may sign the lease.

3.4 Emergency Shelter

From time to time, the CAO may authorize emergency shelter on a temporary basis with a periodic tenancy, which will typically be month-to-month. Emergency shelter may not offer all of the equipment, services, and occupancy latitude standard in permanent housing. Specifically, neither guests nor subleases will typically be permitted in emergency shelter.

Members who wish to be considered for emergency shelter should contact the Housing Department and explain their need. The Housing Department will gather information to provide to the CAO, but will not require a full Rental Application and customary application evaluation. The requirement that rental vacancies be advertised for a standard amount of time shall not apply to emergency shelter.

When emergency shelter is provided, a Rental Agreement will be signed and rent will be paid in accordance with this policy. All tenant responsibilities in this Housing Policy shall apply.

If a member resides in emergency shelter and wishes to apply for a permanent rental unit, he or she shall submit a Housing Application to be scored in accordance with this Policy. The applicant shall be presumed to reside in temporary housing, and need not submit additional proof of this to the Housing Department.

3.5 Rental Agreement

The Rental Agreement has been developed to protect the Rental Unit, the Tenant and Malahat Nation. The Rental Agreement sets out the rights and obligations of the Tenant and of Malahat Nation.

For the duration of the Rental Agreement, the Rental Unit is the Tenant's home and the Tenant is entitled to quiet enjoyment and exclusive use of the Rental Unit, reasonable privacy, and freedom from unreasonable disturbance.

Rental Agreements are prepared to be generally consistent with provincial residential tenancy legislation as well as the goals and rules set out by the Malahat Nation in this Housing Policy or otherwise.

Prior to entering into a Rental Agreement, the Housing Department will complete an in-person meeting with the Tenant to explain all aspects of the Rental Program the Rental Agreement and this Housing Policy, including all rights and obligations of Tenants, charges payable by Tenants and consequences of breaching the Rental Agreement and/or this Policy.

Subject to Malahat Nation policies, each Rental Agreement shall describe the Tenant's responsibility for Rent payments, regular Rental Unit maintenance, utility payments, and any services provided to the Rental Unit by Malahat Nation, including without limitation, garbage pickup and snow removal.

Rental Agreements shall be signed by the Chief Administrative Officer, or the Housing Manager if authority has been specifically delegated, and the Tenant prior to the Tenant occupying the Rental Unit. All Tenants must sign a Rental Agreement. The Housing Department shall keep the original Rental Agreements and provide copies to Tenants.

If the Tenant is receiving income/social assistance, the Rental Agreement must be provided to the Band Social Development Worker (BSDW) in the Community Programs Department by the Tenant to ensure eligibility for Shelter Allowance payments; If approved by the BSDW, this must be communicated with the Housing Department.

Rental Agreements shall be reviewed and renewed by the Tenant annually.

Tenants and/or the Housing Department shall also update Rental Agreements when needed to reflect any policy updates, or changes to the list of occupants, Tenant contact information or Rent rates. For greater clarity, a** ll** Rental Agreements shall be renewed by April 1st of every year unless the rental agreement has been signed within 90 days of April 1st. If a Rental Agreement is not renewed, the Rental Agreement shall remain in effect as a month to month tenancy on the same terms. A month to month tenancy may be terminated by Landlord or Tenant at any time by providing 30-day written notice. In the case of a Tenant terminating the agreement, the Tenant shall be responsible for payment of any rent coming due within the 30-day period.

3.5.1 Notice

Unless otherwise modified by this agreement, Notice must be provided as follows:

Notice to the Tenant may be given by:

  1. hand delivery to the Tenant;
  2. ordinary or registered mail to the Tenant's residential address and/or to any alternate address providing by the Tenant;
  3. leaving a copy with an Authorized Occupant or other adult that apparently resides with the Tenant;
  4. leaving a copy in the Rental Unit's mail box or mail slot;
  5. attaching a copy to a door or other conspicuous place of the Rental Unit; or
  6. transmitting a copy to a fax number or email address provided by the Tenant.

Notice to the Landlord may be given by:

  1. hand delivery to the Landlord's Housing Manager, receptionist, or housing department;
  2. ordinary or registered mail to the Landlord's housing department;
  3. leaving a copy in the Landlord's mail box or mail slot;
  4. transmitting a copy to the Landlord's fax number or email address.

3.6 Tenant Responsibilities

Every person who lives in a Rental Unit has certain responsibilities which must be adhered to as conditions to for them to continue occupying the Rental Unit and property. In general, all individuals must comply with Malahat Nation laws, bylaws and policies, including the terms of this Policy.

All Tenants must occupy their home as their primary residence. If a Tenant no longer uses their home as their primary residence, they must advise the Landlord, who shall evaluate the applicability of a Sublease or Eviction in accordance with this Policy.

In addition, all individuals who have signed a Rental Agreement with Malahat Nation must comply with the terms of that agreement. It is the responsibility of all individuals living in a Rental Unit to become familiar with and uphold all of their responsibilities and obligations.

Tenants must read, understand and agree to adhere to this Policy.

The following is a non-exhaustive list of some of the key responsibilities of Tenants with respect to Rental Units:

  • enter into and sign a Rental Agreement at the beginning of any new tenancy and prior to moving into a Rental Unit;

  • attend and participate in the move-in inspection;

  • enter into and sign a new Rental Agreement each year;

  • comply with all the terms of the Rental Agreement and this Policy;

  • pay Rent in full, regularly and on time as per the terms of the Rental Agreement and this Policy;

  • if in Arrears, enter into an Arrears Agreement with the Housing Department to address repayment of the Arrears;

  • ensure that all utilities and other services are in the Tenant's name (or the name of another person who has agreed to pay for the utilities for the Rental Unit), so that utility companies and other companies do not forward bills to Malahat Nation;

  • pay for heating, electricity and other utilities;

  • keep the Rental Unit, yard and surrounding area in good, clean and sanitary condition as per the community standard;

  • remove junk vehicles (cars, trailers, recreation boats, etc.) that are uninsured, not road worthy or otherwise inoperable and other rubbish where it poses a health, environmental or safety hazard;

  • perform minor maintenance on the Rental Unit and prevent damage from occurring;

  • obtain written permission from the Housing Department, including any required building permits or other permits or licenses required under this Policy, an agreement, or any other Malahat Nation policies or laws, before commencing any major repairs, renovations or improvements to the Rental Unit or property;

  • ensure all renovations and/or repairs meet building code requirements, and pay as Additional Rent any expenses incurred by the Housing Department to bring renovations or repairs into compliance with the building code, should such work be required;

  • pay for the cost of repairing any damage to the Rental Unit that is caused by the deliberate or negligent acts or omissions of the Tenant(s), Authorized Occupant(s), and/or guest(s). The Tenant may only repair such damage themselves with the written permission of the Housing Department; Repairs must be made within 30 days of written notice.

  • when maintenance is being conducted on the Rental Unit, ensure that the area where repairs are being done is free of clutter and waste;

  • notify the Housing Department prior to building a fence or digging in the yard and/or area surrounding the Rental Unit to ensure that no underground utility lines are disturbed;

  • maintain insurance of personal property in the Rental Unit. Should disaster strike, including structural and utilities failures, Malahat Nation will not be responsible for the loss of any personal property;

  • indemnify and save harmless Malahat Nation from all liabilities, fines, suits and claims of any kind of which Malahat Nation or the Housing Department may be liable or suffer by reason of the Tenant's occupancy of the Rental Unit;

  • immediately notify the Housing Department when planning to vacate or leave a Rental Unit for more than 30 days; and

  • respect the rights and privacy of neighbors.

Tenants must not:

  • assign or sublet any Rental Unit except in accordance with this Policy;

  • make any improvements or alterations to a Rental Unit, which may render void or voidable any policy of insurance held by Malahat Nation generally and/or the Housing Department specifically;

  • sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of any appliances, or other equipment owned by Malahat Nation without direct written approval from Malahat Nation;

  • use the Rental Unit, or allow the Rental Unit to be used, for any purpose other than as a residential dwelling for the Tenant, Authorized Occupants, and/or guests, unless other arrangements have been made with the Housing Department in writing;

  • conduct business activities of any kind on, in or around the Rental Unit, unless the Tenant has obtained the express written approval of the Housing Manager and has provided proof of adequate insurance.

3.6.1 Authorized Occupants

The Rental Agreement shall list all Authorized Occupants. Anyone who enters the home to remain temporarily is a guest. Guests may reside in the home temporarily for a period of 20 consecutive days, to a total of 30 days in any six-month period. If any Guest wishes to remain in the home for more than 20 consecutive days or 30 days in a six-month period, the Tenant may request that the Housing Department update the Rental Agreement to include this person as an Authorized Occupant. This will be done at the sole discretion of the Housing Department. It is expected that Tenants will respect the spirit of this rule, and the Housing Department shall have the right to refuse Guest access at any time.

3.6.2 Pets

No pets are permitted inside or outside the Rental Unit without the prior written approval of the Housing Manager, which must be signed by both the Housing Manager and Tenant and appended to the rental agreement.

If Tenant wishes to have a pet in the Rental Unit, Tenant shall schedule a meeting with the Housing Manager to evaluate if it is appropriate.

If a pet is allowed, a Pet Deposit will need to be supplied and will be the equivalent of one month of rent per pet in the household.

If a pet is allowed, a description of the Pet including Registered Tag information must be in the agreement.

If a pet is allowed, the Tenant shall meet his/her obligations for care of the Rental Unit and property as outlined in this Agreement, the Housing Policy and any addendum to this Agreement made in respect of the pet.

If a pet is allowed, the Tenant shall have to pay for any and all damage done to the Rental Unit and property by the pet.

Additional terms and conditions may be required at any time without a requirement of prior notice. The Landlord is obligated to inform the Tenant of any such changes.

3.6.3 Smoking

Smoking of any combustible material in the Rental Unit or within ten (10) meters of another Rental Unit is strictly prohibited.

3.6.4 Cannabis Cultivation

Cultivation of cannabis in the Rental Unit or on the Residential Property is strictly prohibited pursuant to Section 4-2(2) of the Malahat Nation Cannabis Control Law.

3.6.5 Insurance

The Tenant is solely responsible for insuring his or her personal property against loss from any and all causes. The Landlord, including the Malahat Nation Housing Department, shall in no event be responsible for the loss, destruction, theft of, or damages to, such property.

The Tenant shall indemnify and save harmless the Landlord from all liabilities, fines, suits, and claims of any kind whatsoever or which the Landlord may be liable or suffer by reason of the Tenant's occupancy of the Rental Unit.

The Tenant shall not do, or omit to do, anything which may render void or voidable any policy of insurance held by the Landlord generally and/or the Malahat Nation Housing Department specifically.

The Tenant shall be responsible for paying the deductible on the Landlord's insurance for any claims arising as a result of wilful damage to the Rental Unit caused by the Tenant, an Authorized Occupant and/or guest.

The Landlord shall insure the Rental Unit against damage caused by fire, or as a consequence of circumstances of Force Majeure.

3.7 Payment of Rent

All Tenants are expected to pay Rent. Rental payments contribute toward the cost of housing and are used to protect the community's investment in Nation-Owned Houses and to maximize housing resources.

All payments are to made to the Finance Department and the payee is "Malahat Nation."

Rent is due on the on the first (1st) day of each month. All Tenants occupying a Rental Unit have agreed to pay Rent, as stated in their signed Rental Agreements with Malahat Nation.

The Landlord shall provide a receipt for any and all rent payments.

Tenants receiving income/social assistance must make arrangements with the Band Social Development Worker (BSDW) in the Community Programs Department to ensure that Rent payments are made on their behalf to the Malahat Nation and are in compliance with Federal Law and policy. Once such arrangements are made, the BSDW will allocate Shelter Allowance for Rent in accordance with Federal Law and policy on the Tenant's behalf. Any remaining rental cost not covered by the Shelter Allowance will be the sole responsibility of the Tenant.

Malahat Nation employees who are in Arrears may make arrangements with the Housing Department to pay the Arrears through wage deductions. Malahat Nation employees not in Arrears can also make arrangements for wage deductions to pay their Rent.

3.8 Rental Rates/Universal Rental Regime

Malahat Nation employs a Universal Rental Regime which provides consistent rental rates for Malahat Nation homes.

The standardized base rental rates will be derived from the number of bedrooms in the rental unit and subject to downward modification based on the condition of the home.

They are as follows:

Studio home: 350.00 plus utilities

1 (one) Bedroom home: 500.00 plus utilities

2 (two) Bedroom home: 600.00 plus utilities

3 (three) Bedroom home: 700.00 plus utilities

4 (four) Bedroom home: 775.00 plus utilities

5 (five) Bedroom home: 850.00 plus utilities

This rental regime is applicable to all band owned homes on reserve, regardless of tenancy. It is applicable to all residents with a tenancy agreement.

CMHC homes Rental Agreements will have rates based on the CMHC operating agreement.

3.8.1 Services/Utilities

In addition to rent, Malahat Nation charges MTSA (Municipal Type Service Agreement) fees to cover municipal services such as garbage and street lights. This is because Malahat Nation has agreements with third party entities to supply these services to the Nation's residents.

MTSA fees are charged per bedroom as follows:

  • 1 bedroom units: 18.80
  • 2 bedroom units: 18.80
  • 3+ bedrooms: 37.60

Residents who have woodstoves and would like to purchase firewood from Malahat Nation can do so for $25 per month. This covers three cords of wood per year.

Malahat Nation provides Shaw internet and a home phone line for a reduced rate to tenants upon request.

3.9 Arrears Management

Collection procedures and the consequences of being in Arrears are further outlined in the Rental Agreement.

The following applies to all Tenants. Rent is due on the 1st (first) day of each month. The following procedure will be applied immediately after one Rent payment has been missed:

  • If the Tenant fails to pay the Rent on time, the Landlord shall send the Tenant a first notice 30 days after the date the Rent came due. The Tenant shall immediately pay the arrears in full or meet with the Landlord to enter into an arrears agreement.

  • If no payment has been received within 60 days after the date the Rent came due, and no arrears agreement made, a second notice shall be delivered along with a scheduled meeting time for a meeting between the Tenant and the Landlord to discuss the situation and to make arrangements for the payment of the arrears.

  • If no payment has been received within 90 days after the date the Rent came due, and no arrears agreement made, a final notice shall be delivered to the Tenant advising the Tenant that they have five working days to make full payment of the arrears, enter into an arrears agreement or vacate the Rental Unit.

  • Every effort will be made to avoid an Eviction. If 95 days after the date the Rent came due the arrears have not been paid or the Tenant has failed to enter into and/or comply with the terms of an arrears agreement, an eviction notice shall be delivered to the Tenant and the Tenant shall have 10 days to vacate the Rental Unit.

Both the Tenant and the Housing Department must agree to all Arrears Agreements in writing. The Arrears Agreement will include the amount of each repayment installment and the date the payment is due. If a Tenant receives two Final Notices within a fiscal year, the Tenant's Rental Agreement will be terminated and an Eviction Notice will be issued to the Tenant.

The Tenant may appeal an Eviction by following the appeal process outlined at Section 7.0 of this Policy.

3.10 Maintenance

Malahat Nation Responsibilities

Malahat Nation, through the Housing Department, is responsible for major repairs and replacements, repairs arising from normal wear and tear, and preventative maintenance necessary to ensure compliance with health and safety standards and/or to extend the useful life of the Rental Unit.

Major repairs and replacements (subject to availability of funding) are generally defined as follows:

  • roof repairs;
  • plumbing repairs;
  • hot water tank replacement;
  • electrical work;
  • major structural work;
  • electrical fixture replacement;
  • repairing appliances owned by Malahat Nation (as long as they were not damaged or overloaded as a result of the intentional or negligent acts or omissions of a Tenant, Authorized Occupant, or guest);
  • replacing broken windows (as long as they were not damaged as a result of the intentional or negligent acts or omissions of a Tenant, Authorized Occupant, or guest);
  • repairs to floors, doors and cupboards as needed; and
  • locks (when replacement is necessary to ensure the security of the Rental Unit and/or Tenant or where the lock is no longer functioning properly).

The Housing Department will keep a record of all maintenance and repairs carried out on a Rental Unit including reason for the repairs, repair items and costs.

Malahat Nation and the Housing Department may provide additional services to Tenants, such as garbage collection, sewer and water services. The provision of such services shall be on a case by case basis and shall require an accompanying agreement.

Tenant Responsibilities

In addition to those responsibilities outlined in Section 3.6 of this Policy, Tenants are responsible for the general maintenance, cleaning, repairs and replacements outlined in the Rental Agreement. A schedule of specific Tenant maintenance responsibilities is included in the Rental Agreement.

The Tenant will be solely responsible for the cost of all repairs and replacements required due to the negligent or intentional acts or omissions of the Tenant(s), Authorized Occupants, and/or guests. Where damage has been caused by the negligent or intentional acts or omissions of the Tenant(s), Authorized Occupants, and/or guests, the Housing Department will take the following approach :

  • if the damage is minor (less than $1,000), the Housing Department will carry out the repair and/or replacement, and the costs will be charged back to the Tenant as Additional Rent and any amount not paid will constitute Arrears; and

  • if the damage is major (over $1,000), the Housing Department will provide the Tenant with a written notice including an estimate of the cost for the Housing Department to carry out the repair and/or replacement. The Tenant will have thirty (30) days from the date on the notice to make arrangements with the Housing Department to pay for the repair and/or replacement. Failure to enter into a payment arrangement within thirty (30) days, or failure to comply with the payment arrangement, may result in Eviction.

Tenants must immediately report to the Housing Department any accident, break or defect in water, heating or electrical systems, or in any part of the Rental Unit and its' equipment in general.

Tenants are required to keep their Rental Unit and surrounding area clean, the grass cut and free of refuse, animal waste, uninsured and/or inoperable vehicles or vessels, vehicle parts, equipment, appliances, and debris such as building materials. Tenants who fail to comply with this requirement will be given a written notice to remove the junked vehicles and/or garbage, after which the Housing Department will remove the items at the Tenant's expense. Failure of the Tenant to remit payment for such costs is a breach of the Rental Agreement.

When the Housing Department is to perform maintenance duties, the Tenant must ensure that the area where maintenance is being performed is safe and free of clutter, waste or other hazards.

3.10.1 Cleaning Support

Malahat Nation and will provide cleaning services to all Tenants at a reasonable rate. This is an optional service intended to support Tenants and preserve the housing stock.

If the Tenant chooses not to utilize the service, they will be solely responsible for maintaining the cleanliness of the property as outlined in §3.6, §3.10, and their rental agreement.

In the event a Tenant opts out from utilizing the cleaning service, after thirty (30) days the Housing Department will inspect the property in accordance with §3.12 to ensure compliance with the housing policy and rental agreement. The Housing Department will provide the Tenant with a list of any violations of the maintenance standards and give the Tenant 30 days to correct the issues.

If after a second inspection the property is still in violation, the cleaning service will become mandatory and the charge for the cleaning will be added to the tenancy agreement. If the Tenant refuses the cleaning service or prevents the cleaning service from entering the property, any further violations of the required maintenance will be considered a violation of the housing policy and/or rental agreement and the processes outlined in §3.18 will be initiated.

3.10.2 Emergency Repairs

Emergency repairs are repairs that are urgent and necessary for the health and safety of persons or the preservation or use of the Rental Unit, and generally limited to repairs to:

  1. major leaks in pipes or the roof;
  2. damaged or blocked water or sewer pipes or plumbing fixtures;
  3. the primary heating system;
  4. the electrical system
  5. deficiencies in the integrity of the structure; and
  6. damage that jeopardizes the Rental Unit or the health and safety of persons.

Tenants are advised to immediately call 911 for any incidents that immediately threaten the wellbeing of the occupants. This includes fire, etc.

The Landlord shall give to the Tenant in writing, the name and telephone number of both the designated contact person for emergency repairs and a secondary contact.

If emergency repairs are required, the Tenant shall contact the Designated Contact immediately and without delay by both phone and text message if possible.

If after 30 minutes no response has been received from the Designated Contact, Tenants are instructed to contact the Secondary contact person by both phone and text message if possible.

If after 15 minutes no response has been received from the Secondary Contact, the Tenant may undertake the emergency repairs and claim reimbursement from the Landlord upon presentation of a receipt.

If the Tenant undertakes emergency repairs in accordance with this section, the Landlord may take over completion of the emergency repairs at any time.

3.11 Renovation of Rental Units

Tenants must receive written permission from the Housing Department prior to making any major repairs, alterations, additions or improvements to a Rental Unit and, where applicable, are responsible for obtaining any permits or other permits or licenses requires under any Malahat Nation policy or law. A qualified inspector shall review any such alterations, additions, or improvements to ensure they meet applicable codes, laws and policies.

If a Tenant makes any alterations, additions or improvements to a Rental Unit without first obtaining permission from the Housing Department, the Tenant will be solely responsible for returning the Rental Unit to its original condition at the Tenant's own expense and at no cost to the Malahat Nation.

Tenants will not be reimbursed for any alterations, additions or improvements they have completed at their own expense.

Except where otherwise agreed to in writing by the Parties, all improvements to the Rental Unit will become the property of the Landlord

3.12 Inspections

If, at any time, the Housing Department and a qualified inspector conduct an inspection and determine that the Rental Units is in such condition that it should be condemned or has severe structural damage posing a hazard to health and/or safety, then any person occupying the Rental Unit will be removed and placed into temporary housing. A Tenant removed from such a home shall submit a Housing Application which will be given priority over other Housing Applications on the Waiting List if is not possible to move them back into their original unit

However, if a Rental Unit is condemned or has severe structural damage posing a hazard to health and/or safety because of the deliberate or negligent acts or omissions of the Tenant, or their Immediate Family and/or guests, the Tenant will be deemed to have been Evicted.

Regular Inspections

Malahat Nation and the Housing Department may inspect Rental Units on a quarterly basis and/or at any other time with twenty-four (24) hours written notice. The inspection will be carried out to record the condition of the Rental Unit. These inspections will identify the need for any preventative maintenance as well as to determine any misuse or negligence on the part of the Tenant(s), any Authorized Occupants, and/or guests.

Move-In Inspection

A move-in inspection will be completed on the day the Tenant is entitled to take possession of the Rental Unit or on another mutually agreed upon day that is prior to the Tenant taking possession of the Rental Unit.

The move-in inspection will be completed jointly by the Tenant and a representative of the Housing Department. The Tenant MUST be present during the inspection.

The Housing Department representative will complete a Home Inspection that confirms the condition of the property. The report must be reviewed and signed off by both the Housing Department representative and the Tenant.

Move-Out Inspection

A move-out inspection will be completed by the Housing Department and Tenant on or after the day the Tenant ceases to occupy the Rental Unit and prior to any new Tenant taking possession of the Rental Unit.

The Housing Department must complete a Home Inspection Form. Subject to the following paragraph, both the Housing Department and Tenant must sign the Home Inspection Form and the Housing Department must give the Tenant a copy of the form.

The Housing Department may perform the inspection and complete and sign the Home Inspection Form without the Tenant if the Housing Department has provided twenty-four (24) hours' notice of the inspection and the Tenant fails to participate, has abandoned the Rental Unit or has been Evicted.

Any repairs to the Rental Unit that are required as the result of the deliberate or negligent acts or omissions of the Tenant or their Immediate Family, Authorized Occupants, and/or guests shall be confirmed in writing to the Tenant and cost recovery will be pursued by the Housing Department. Tenants will not be billed for regular wear and tear.

3.13 Fires

After a fire has been reported, the Housing Department shall ensure that there is a full investigation and that the following information is documented and retained:

  • the name of the Rental Unit Tenant;
  • location of the Rental Unit;
  • how the fire was started;
  • report of injuries or fatalities; and
  • extent of the damage to the Rental Unit.

The Housing Department shall also:

  • report to the fire to authorities, as required; and
  • file a copy of any official fire report.

Accidental fires will be covered under Malahat Nation's insurance and the deductible will be paid by Malahat Nation. If it is determined that a fire was caused by the deliberate or negligent act or omission of the Tenant, or by the Immediate Family, Authorized Occupant, and/or guest of the Tenant, the Tenant will be responsible for paying any amounts that are not covered by Malahat Nation's insurance policy. Malahat Nation is not responsible for insuring the personal property of Tenants and will not be responsible for the personal property of Tenants which is destroyed by fire.

Tenants of Rental Units rendered uninhabitable by fires will be required to re-apply for a new Rental Unit allocation. Where the fire was accidental, the Tenant shall submit a Housing Application which will be given priority over other Housing Applications already on the Waiting List. However, if it is determined that the fire was the result of a deliberate or negligent act or omission of the Tenant, or their Immediate Family and/or guests, the Tenant will be deemed to have been Evicted.

3.14 Abandoned Units

Tenants who have abandoned a Rental Unit will be deemed to have been Evicted from the Rental Unit. A Rental Unit will be deemed abandoned when:

  • the Rental Unit has been unoccupied for more than sixty (60) days by the Tenant named in the Rental Agreement;
  • no Rent payments been made for more than sixty (60) days; and
  • no utility payments have been made for more than sixty (60) days.

Upon a Rental Unit being deemed abandoned, an eviction notice will be issued to the Tenant to confirm their residency. The notice will be hand delivered to the Tenant, placed in the Tenant's mailbox and/or taped to the Rental Unit door. The Tenant must respond to the notice within fifteen (15) days. In cases where no response is received within fifteen (15) days, the Rental Unit will be re-allocated in accordance with this Policy and the Waiting List pending any necessary repairs.

Any Arrears and the cost of repairing any damage not caused by regular wear and tear shall be the responsibility of the Tenant that abandoned the Rental Unit, and will all be a debt owed to and recoverable by Malahat Nation. Similarly, any costs associated with the removal of personal effects (furniture, clothing, etc.) left in an abandoned Rental Unit, shall be the responsibility of the Tenant that abandoned the Rental Unit and will be a debt owed to and recoverable by Malahat Nation.

Personal effects left in the house will be held for one month. Malahat Nation is not liable for any lost or damaged personal effects in the event of an abandoned unit.

3.15 Death of a Tenant

In the event of a Tenant's death and there are still Tenants listed on the lease, the lease is considered valid unless the remaining Tenant(s) wishes to terminate the lease.

In the event of a Tenant's death, the CAO or, if explicitly delegated, the Housing Manager, may reassign the deceased Tenant's Rental Agreement. Members already living in the Rental Unit will be given priority in the following order:

  • Spouse of the deceased Tenant;
  • adult children of the deceased Tenant that are eighteen (18) years of age or older;
  • legal guardian(s) of any minor children of the deceased Tenant; and
  • a Member who lives in the Rental Unit who is willing to assume all Tenant responsibilities for the Rental Unit, including the responsibility of paying Rent.

In order for a person listed above to begin to occupy or to continue to occupy the Rental Unit, a new Rental Agreement must be entered into and signed by the new Tenant and the Housing Department. If none of the above listed persons requires the Rental Unit, the Rental Unit will be re-allocated in accordance with this Policy and the Waiting List.

In the event that the person who takes priority is a Spouse or legal guardian who is not a Member, but has a minor Member child, the Non-member Spouse or legal guardian may continue to occupy the Rental Unit with the Member child until the child is no longer a minor. Once the Member child has reached the age of majority (eighteen (18) years of age), the Member child may enter into a Rental Agreement and the Non-member Spouse/parent/guardian may continue to occupy the home as an authorized occupant in accordance with this Policy.

For single Tenants, Tenants with no eligible next of kin, and/or Tenants who live alone, the Housing Department will wait two (2) weeks to consult with family members. After the two (2) week period, the family, friends or executor(ix) will be required to make the necessary arrangements for access to the Rental Unit and will remove all the personal belongings within another two (2) weeks. The Housing Department will then re-allocate the Rental Unit in accordance with this policy and the waiting list.

3.16 Marital Breakdown

In the case of marital breakdown where there are no children of the relationship, both parties are Members and the Rental Agreement is in both names, Malahat Nation will ask the Tenants to work out an arrangement where one of the Tenants retains the right to possession of the Rental Unit. If the Tenants are unable to work out an arrangement within thirty (30) days, both parties will submit a Housing Application to the Housing Department and the Housing Department will score the applications using the Application Scoring Guide. The highest score will retain possession of the Rental Unit and the right to occupy it. Upon the Housing Manager or the designated Housing Department employee(s) allocating the Rental Unit, the new Tenant must enter into and sign a Rental Agreement with the Housing Department.

In the case of marital breakdown where there are no children of the relationship, both parties are Members but the Rental Agreement is in only one Member's name, the Rental Agreement will remain in that Member's name and he/she will retain possession of the Rental Unit and the right to occupy it.

In the case of marital breakdown where there are no children of the relationship and one of the parties is a Non-member, the Rental Agreement will remain in the name of the Member.

In the case of marital breakdown where there are children of the relationship, the following rules will apply:

  • If both parents are Members, the parent who has primary care of the child (or children) will retain possession of the Rental Unit and will have the right to occupy it. If the parent with primary care of the child (or children) is not named as a Tenant on the original Rental Agreement, then he/she will be required to enter into a new Rental Agreement.

  • If the parent with primary care of the child (or children) and the child (or children) are all Non-members, the parent will be offered a new tenancy agreement allowing them to reside in the rental unit for up to six (6) months. At the conclusion of six (6) months the parent will have the option to sign a new lease if they are eligible under this housing policy. If they are not eligible tenants, they will have to vacate the unit at the conclusion of the 6 month lease.

  • If the child (or children) is a Member and the parent with primary care of the child (or children) is a Non-member, the Non-member parent with primary care of the child (or children) will retain possession of the Rental Unit and will have the right to occupy the Rental Unit so long as the Member child (or children) lives there and the Non-member parent retains primary care of the child (or children). The Non-member parent will be required to enter into a Rental Agreement. Once the Member child has reached the age of majority (eighteen (18) years of age), the Member child may enter into a Rental Agreement and the Non-member Spouse/parent/guardian may continue to occupy the home as an authorized occupant in accordance with this Policy.

3.17 Subleases of Rental Units

Prohibited Transfers

Rental Agreements and the right to occupy a Rental Unit may not be transferred or assigned without the prior written approval of the Housing Department.

A Tenant cannot transfer a Rental Agreement nor the right to occupy a Rental Unit because the Tenant no longer requires the Rental Unit. In such cases, the Tenant may move out of the Rental Unit after providing the Housing Department with thirty (30) days' notice. The Rental Unit will then be re-allocated in accordance with this Policy and the Waiting List. However, the Housing Department reserves the right to review such situations on a case by case basis.

Application Procedure

Under certain circumstances, a Tenant may apply to the Housing Department for permission to sublet his/her Rental Unit to another Member.

Tenants may apply to sublet a Rental Unit for any of the following reasons:

  • health reasons (e.g. the Tenant requires long-term hospitalization);
  • changes to social assistance eligibility;
  • educational reasons (e.g. the Tenant is going away to attend school)
  • employment reasons; or
  • for other reasons the Housing Department deems appropriate.

Tenants applying for a Sublease must submit the following to the Housing Department:

  • a completed Sublease Application Form (Available upon request from Housing Department); and

  • a letter of explanation outlining the situation.

Sublease Applications must be accompanied by supporting documentation as follows:

  • for health-related Subleases, the Tenant must provide a letter from his/her physician stating the need for extended hospitalization or out of town treatment and an estimate of how long the hospitalization or out of town treatment will be required; or

  • for education-related Subleases, the Tenant must provide a copy of his/her letter of acceptance or other proof of enrolment from the educational institution the Tenant will be attending.

The Housing Department will review Sublease Applications and the CAO approve Subleases where a Sublease is appropriate in all the circumstances on a case by case basis.

Sublease Agreement

Once the Housing Department has approved a Sublease, the Subtenant taking over the Rental Unit will enter into a Sublease Agreement with Malahat Nation.

The Sublease Agreement must state:

  • the terms and conditions of the Sublease, including that the Subtenant will be responsible for paying Rent and maintaining the Rental Unit in good condition;

  • that the Subtenant will have all the responsibilities of a Tenant for the life of the Sublease Agreement;

  • that Malahat Nation may enforce the terms of the Sublease Agreement against the Subtenant as though the Subtenant were the primary Tenant;

  • that the Subtenant accepts the Rental Unit on an "as is" basis;

  • that by signing the Sublease Agreement the Subtenant acknowledges he/she is aware of his/her responsibility for securing his/her own accommodations after the Sublease Agreement expires; and

  • when the Sublease Agreement expires and terminates and/or if the Sublease Agreement may be renewed with proof of enrolment in an educational institution.

The maximum term for a Sublease Agreement will typically be two (2) years. However, if the Tenant is applying for a Sublease to attend school, the length of the sublease may be for the duration of the program he/she is enrolled in. The Tenant must provide the Housing Department with proof of enrolment every year or the Sublease and the Sublease Agreement will be terminated. For greater certainty, the Sublease Agreement must state when it and the Sublease expires and/or if it may be renewed with proof of enrolment in an educational institution.

A Sublease may be cancelled at any time upon the mutual agreement of the primary Tenant and the Subtenant. The Tenant and Subtenant must provide the Housing Department with thirty (30) days' notice of their desire to cancel a Sublease, if they fail to do so the Housing Department may refuse to terminate the Sublease Agreement for a period of up to thirty (30) days.

Survival of the Rental Agreement

The Rental Agreement between Malahat Nation and the original Tenant remains in force for the duration of the Sublease and survives the expiration and/or termination of the Sublease Agreement. The original Tenant is ultimately responsible to ensure that all the obligations of the Rental Agreement, including paying Rent and utilities, are met. This means that if the Subtenant breaches the terms of the Sublease Agreement and Malahat Nation is unable to recover Arrears, costs, damages or other expenses from the Subtenant, the original Tenant will be responsible.

If the Subtenant is Evicted by Malahat Nation or abandons the Rental Unit, the original Tenant will be considered to have been evicted as well.

If a Tenant allows another Member or person to reside in a Rental Unit without the approval of the Housing Department, the Tenant will be responsible for any damage to the Rental Unit and may be subject to Eviction.

3.18 Eviction & Termination of a Rental Agreement

Malahat Nation may Evict a Tenant where a Rental Agreement is terminated due to breach of this Housing Policy and/or the Rental Agreement. Malahat Nation considers Eviction to be a last resort to be taken when all attempts to resolve the issues have failed. Prior to taking Eviction action, the Housing Department will make every effort to provide reasonable warning(s) and may attempt to meet with the Tenant to reinforce the consequences of failing to resolve the breach of the Rental Agreement and/or this Policy

Any person occupying a Rental Unit without the permission of the Housing Department will be Evicted immediately and without notice.

Tenants or persons within a Rental Unit may be Evicted by the CAO for any of the following reasons. This list is non-exhaustive and is intended solely to provide examples of possible bases for eviction.

  1. making false declarations on a Housing Application that results in a housing allocation;
  2. being convicted of engaging in illegal activities in a Nation-Owned House
  3. causing willful damage to a Rental Unit and/or property within or on a Rental Unit that belongs to Malahat Nation
  4. the Tenant, an Authorized Occupant and/or guest has caused a nuisance or an on-going disturbance to the community or has adversely affected or is likely to adversely affect the health, safety or well-being of the community;
  5. the Tenant ceases to be a member of Malahat Nation or there are no Authorized Occupants who are members of Malahat Nation;
  6. the Tenant does not repair, clean and/or maintain the Rental Unit as required under this Agreement;
  7. the Tenant fails to fulfill the terms of their Arrears Agreement; or
  8. breaching a term of this Policy and/or a Rental Agreement or Sublease Agreement.

For clarity, the Housing Department recommends evictions to the CAO, who makes the final decision whether to Evict a Tenant. If a Housing Committee has been established, the CAO may delegate authority over this section to the Housing Committee.

Disturbances & Complaints

Complaints regarding a Tenant must be provided in writing and submitted to the Housing Department. Complaints will only be discussed with complainants and the Tenant who is the subject of the complaint and the identity of complainants will be kept confidential. If, in the opinion of the Housing Department, a Tenant is causing a nuisance or an on-going disturbance, a warning may be issued.

Warnings

If it has been determined a breach of the Rental Agreement has occurred, the Housing Department will undertake the following steps:

  1. First Written warning;
  2. Second Written warning(s); and
  3. Eviction.

Tenants who have received one (1) or more warnings but have not been Evicted will return to good standing with the Housing Department provided they do not receive any additional warnings for at least one (1) year.

Eviction

When an eviction notice has been issued, the housing department will declare the tenancy ended for the tenant or occupant to whom the notice has been issued. If any or all others occupants are residing in the home they will need to come forward and sign a tenancy agreement with the Housing Department if they qualify for housing. They will be given first refusal of the occupying home. Upon receiving an eviction notice, the Tenant will have 10 days to vacate the Rental Unit and shall leave the Rental Unit in the condition required under § 3.17. At the conclusion of that 10 days the tenancy and the Tenant's rights under this agreement shall cease absolutely, without right of re-entry, and the Landlord or it's agent may re-enter the Rental Unit or any part of it, and thereafter have, possess, and enjoy it as if no Rental Agreement had been made.

Exigent circumstances

While every effort will be made to follow the aforementioned notice period, if exigent circumstances are present, the Housing Department may eliminate the notice requirement and reduce the time to vacate to as short as 24 hours. Exigent circumstances could include, but are not limited to: removing a Tenant who is a danger to other residents acting for the safety of the children, or removing a violent tenant.

If a Tenant is Evicted from a Rental Unit, the Housing Department may reject any subsequent Housing Application submitted by the former Tenant if it is in the best interest of the Nation.

Where the reason for Eviction is Arrears, the Tenant will not qualify for future housing until the Arrears are paid in full.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, Malahat Nation may consider Housing Applications of former Tenants who were Evicted at any time on a case by case basis.

3.19 Vacating a Rental Unit

All Tenants shall notify the Housing Department, in writing, thirty (30) days prior to vacating a Rental Unit. A notice to end this Agreement given by the Tenant the day before the rent is due in a given month ends the tenancy at the end of the following month. [For example, if the Tenant wants to move at the end of May, the Tenant must make sure the Landlord receives written notice on or before April 30th.]

In the event a Tenant vacates the home and there are still Tenants listed on the lease, the lease is considered valid unless the remaining Tenant(s) wishes to terminate the lease.

In the event a Tenant vacates the home and there is no other Tenant listed on the agreement, the CAO or, if explicitly delegated, the Housing Manager, may reassign the deceased Tenant's Rental Agreement. Members already living in the Rental Unit will be given priority in the following order:

  • Spouse of the deceased Tenant;
  • adult children of the deceased Tenant that are eighteen (18) years of age or older;
  • legal guardian(s) of any minor children of the deceased Tenant; and
  • a Member who lives in the Rental Unit who is willing to assume all Tenant responsibilities for the Rental Unit, including the responsibility of paying Rent.

In order for a person listed above to begin to occupy or to continue to occupy the Rental Unit, a new Rental Agreement must be entered into and signed by the new Tenant and the Housing Department. If none of the above listed persons requires the Rental Unit, the Rental Unit will be re-allocated in accordance with this Policy and the Waiting List.

The notice required under this section must be in writing and must:

  1. include the address of the Rental Unit;
  2. include the date the tenancy and this Agreement is to end; and
  3. be signed and dated by the Tenant.

The Tenant shall vacate the Rental Unit by 1 p.m. on the day the tenancy and this Agreement is deemed to end and leave the unit in a re-rentable condition.

Re-rentable condition means that:

  1. floors are cleaned and washed;
  2. walls are cleaned and washed;
  3. carpets are vacuumed and cleaned and any stains are shampooed out;
  4. all electric light bulbs are functioning and in place;
  5. the refrigerator and/or freezer is cleaned of all food and stains and defrosted and there are no debris under or behind the refrigerator and/or freezer;
  6. the range is cleaned and free of all grease inside and out and free of all debris;
  7. the stove and stove glass is clean and there is no debris under or behind the stove and all fuses for the stove are working;
  8. all cupboards, closets, cabinets, etc. have been cleaned out;
  9. all garbage has been removed from the Rental Unit; and
  10. the washer and dryer are cleaned inside and out and there is no debris under or behind the washer or dryer.

If a Tenant vacates a Rental Unit without informing the Housing Department, the Rental Unit may be deemed abandoned, the Tenant may be deemed to have been evicted and the Rental Unit may be re-allocated in accordance with this Policy and the Waiting List.

If the Tenant does not vacate the Rental Unit at the required date defined in the termination of rental notice, the Housing Department may obtain the services of law enforcement to assist with removing the Tenant.

A Tenant who leaves personal property in the Rental Unit after vacating the Rental Unit and is, therefore, no longer authorized to have access to the Rental Unit, must contact the Housing Department in order to enter the Rental Unit and remove the personal property within thirty (30) days of vacating the Rental Unit. After that time, the Housing Department may dispose of the personal property at its discretion. The Tenant will be responsible for any costs incurred by the Housing Department in disposing of the personal property, and these costs will be a debt owed to and recoverable by Malahat Nation.

Section 4.0 – Shelter Allowance Program

4.1 Mortgaged Rental Units

In order to provide safe, affordable and adequate housing for all Members, Council may continue to offer Nation-Owned Houses on a rental basis where the mortgage(s) for the unit have been paid in full. Nation-Owned Houses that are no longer subject to a mortgage, were constructed and financed through the CMHC Section 95 program or bank financing and are occupied by a Tenant will be referred to as a Mortgaged Rental Unit for the purposes of this Policy.

This shall apply to new and existing Mortgaged Rental Units subject to the following:

  • Mortgaged Rental Units are Nation-Owned Houses and remain the property of Malahat Nation unless and until they are purchased by a Member in accordance with section 5.2 of this Policy;

  • once a mortgage has been paid in full, a new Rental Agreement shall be signed by the Tenant and the Housing Department;

  • For Tenants that receive or are eligible for Income Assistance, a portion or whole amount of the rent may be paid, based on Income Assistance shelter rates and number of people/families living in the home.

  • the Rental rate will be based on bedroom count and will be pro-rated if members within the household are over eighteen (18) years of age (or are sixteen (16) or seventeen (17) years of age and can demonstrate that he/she has withdrawn from parental control) or are employed;

  • the Band Social Development Worker (BSDW) in the Community Programs Department must be updated on any changes to Household Composition or the persons occupying the home on a monthly basis;

  • Rent and Additional Rent will be used to cover the cost of maintenance, insurance and services, including, but not limited to, services provided by the Malahat Nation, such as water and sewer service, garbage collection, snow removal, etc.; and

  • funds collected as Rent from a Tenant of a Mortgaged Rental Unit will be segregated from Rent collected from Tenants of other Rental Units and will be used exclusively for paying for costs associated with that particular Mortgaged Rental Unit.

4.2 Rental of Privately-Owned Homes

A Homeowner of a Privately-Owned Home may rent out a portion of or all of the Privately-Owned Home to a Private Tenant through a private landlord / tenant arrangement. The Homeowner may set the rent and make conditions of occupancy without any prior approval of Council or the Housing Department as long as the arrangement is in compliance with all Malahat Nation bylaws.

Federal Law and policy provides the guidelines of eligibility that must be met in order for a person receiving income/social assistance to qualify for Shelter Allowance within a prescribed test. Members on income/social assistance wishing to rent a Privately-Owned Home must have a written and signed lease (rental) agreement with the landlord Homeowner in place before any rent can be paid with Shelter Allowance. The lease agreement must be pre-approved by the Band Social Development Worker (BSDW) in the Community Programs Department and Housing Department in order for the Private Tenant to be eligible for Shelter Allowance. A copy of the signed lease agreement must be provided to the BSDW and Housing Department.

In order to assist landlord Homeowners, a Sample Private Rental Agreement has been developed to protect the Privately-Owned Home, the Private Tenant and the Homeowner. The Sample Private Rental Agreement sets out the Private Tenant's obligations and the obligations of the landlord Homeowner. The Sample Private Rental Agreement was developed in order to meet AANDC requirements for shelter allowance.

It is the responsibility of the Homeowner to seek independent legal advice over the use of this Sample Private Rental Agreement. Malahat Nation is not liable for any actions/ liabilities as a result of implementing this Sample Private Rental Agreement. Malahat Nation is not responsible for upkeep, repairs, maintenance, and services to the Privately-Owned Home, except in the ordinary course or as otherwise provide in this Policy. All insurance is the sole responsibility of the landlord Homeowner and the Private Tenant.

Section 5.0 – Renovation Program

5.1 Renovation Program

Housing would like to provide a renovation program that is fair to all community members.

Currently, the bulk of housing renovation income is derived from external agencies. As housing relies heavily on outside resources for renovation funding, we must abide by certain rules (CMHC/AANDC rules).

Housing would like to make sure that every eligible home will be considered for current and/or future renovations. We will also make sure that renovations are completed to B.C. building code standards.

Renovation differ from general maintenance of the home. While renovations consist of generally larger projects that change the structure of a unit with emphasis on changing or upgrading it,

While maintenance means care and or upkeep of a unit that is planned routine or urgent that keeps the structure in proper condition or in working order.

Section 6.0 – Appeal Process

6.1 Facilitated Discussion

Tenants may appeal any decision made in relation to the enforcement of the Housing Policy and/or his/her Rental Agreement. This appeal will begin with a facilitated discussion with the Housing Department. The Tenant may explain why they believe the law was misapplied and the Housing Department will make every effort to resolve their concerns within the confines of Malahat Nation law.

6.2 Council Review

In the event that the Tenant and Housing Department are unable to resolve the issue, it may be brought forward to Chief and Council. Chief and Council will review whether the decision was appropriately made following Malahat Nation law. In the event the law is silent on the issue, Chief and Council will convene for debate and a formal vote to resolve the issue in accordance with the standard of best interests of the Malahat Nation community, and the final decision will be put forth in writing within 14 days.

6.3 Mediation

If the dispute has not been resolved after Council review, the parties may attempt to resolve the dispute through mediation, in accordance with the following procedure:

  1. The parties to the dispute shall jointly select a mediator;
  2. If the parties are unable to agree on a mediator, the parties may request the British Columbia International Commercial Arbitration Centre to appoint a mediator; and
  3. The Mediator to the dispute shall set the rules and procedures for the mediation.
  4. In the event that the Mediator concludes that Malahat law is silent on the issue, they will remand it back for Chief and Council review.

6.4 Arbitration

If the parties are unable to resolve the dispute through mediation, or the parties are not able to agree on a mediation process, the parties may attempt to resolve the dispute through arbitration, in accordance with the following procedure:

  1. The parties to the dispute shall jointly select an Arbitrator;
  2. If the parties are unable to agree on an Arbitrator, the parties may request the British Columbia International Commercial Arbitration Centre to appoint an Arbitrator; and
  3. The Arbitrator of the dispute shall set the rules and procedures for the arbitration.
  4. In the event that the Arbitrator concludes that Malahat law is silent on the issue, they will remand it back for Chief and Council review.
  5. Subject to 7.5, the decision of the Arbitrator shall be final and binding on the parties.

6.5 Final Appeal

Where there is an exception justified by Law, the decision of the Arbitrator may be appealed to a court of competent jurisdiction.

6.6 Costs

Subject to any ruling by an Arbitrator, all parties to a dispute shall bear their own costs in any dispute resolution process they undertake.

For greater clarity, Malahat Nation is only liable or responsible for the costs of any dispute resolution process under this part where Malahat Nation is a party and Malahat Nation is only responsible for its share of the expenses for the dispute resolution process.

Approval and Amendments Log

| Approval | | --- | --- | --- | --- | | Date | | Approved by Administrator | | | Date | Aug 11, 2014 | Approved by Chief and Council | | | | | Band Council Resolution No. | |

| Amendment | | --- | --- | --- | --- | | Date | | Approved by Administrator | | | Date | Sep 10, 2020 | Approved by Chief and Council | | | | | Band Council Resolution No. | 2020/21-010 |

| Amendment | | --- | --- | --- | --- | | Date | | Approved by Administrator | | | Date | Jan 28, 2021 | Approved by Chief and Council | | | | | Band Council Resolution No. | 2020/21-036 |

Local Education Agreement

THIS AGREEMENT made and entered into this _________day of _______, 20__ shall be effective from the 1st day of _________20___.

BETWEEN:

THE MALAHAT NATION

(hereinafter called the "Nation")

AND:

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 79

(hereinafter called the "Board")

(collectively called the "Parties")

WHEREAS On July 1, 2018, the Province of British Columbia, the Government of Canada and the Nations Education Steering Committee entered into the BC Tripartite Education Agreement ("BCTEA"), agreeing to work together to make systemic shifts to support successful educational outcomes of all Nation Students, regardless of where they live or are enrolled in school in British Columbia, through the provision of high quality and culturally relevant elementary and secondary educational programs and services, and supported by funding that is responsive to unique needs of Nation Students, Nation Schools and communities;

WHEREAS The parties to the BCTEA recognize Local Education Agreements ("LEAs") as an integral part of the delivery of education services to Nation students attending BC Schools, as they are an important mechanism for building relationships between Nation communities and boards of education and schools to support improved Nation student outcomes;

WHEREAS The Parties recognize that the signing of this LEA is aligned with the Province of British Columbia's commitment to "take all measures necessary to ensure the laws of British Columbia are consistent with the "United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (the "UN Declaration") and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Calls to Action for reconciliation. Particularly, the Parties acknowledge the importance of children in these documents. In addition, the Parties agree that this approach intends to follow British Columbia's Draft Principles that Guide the Province of British Columbia's Relationship with Indigenous Peoples;

WHEREAS The Board has the authority, under section 86 (3) of the School Act, to enter into agreements with a Council of a Band as defined in the federal Indian Act, RSC, c. I-5, or the council of an Indian band established by another Act of the government of Canada, with respect to the education of Nations Students;

WHEREAS The Nation, pursuant to its inherent jurisdiction over educational matters, has the authority and responsibility for the education of Nation Students and desires to ensure its students all have access to, and receive, quality education that is respectful and reflective of their unique culture and history and this culture and history be taught to all students;

WHEREAS The Parties agree that the principals, teachers and other staff in BC Public Schools have a central and important role to play in the provision of quality education programs and services and in the implementation and effectiveness of a LEA;

AND WHEREAS The Parties wish to enter into this Agreement to set out the terms and conditions regarding the purchase of education services by the Nation from the Board for the Nation's Students.

THEREFORE, the Parties agree as follows:

1. PURPOSE

1.1. The Parties agree that the purposes of this Agreement are to:

a. Confirm the mutual commitment of the Parties, and acknowledge the important role of Schools, to build a positive, effective, collaborative and constructive relationship to ensure Nation’s Students’ positive educational outcomes and achieve high levels of Nation Student success, graduation and transition to post-secondary education and training, or employment;

b. Set out the roles and responsibilities of the Parties and School(s) to meet the purposes and objectives of this Agreement; and

c. Serve as a core shared accountability mechanism for both the Nation and the Board regarding the education of the Nations Students in School District No. 79.

2. GUIDING PRINCIPLES

2.1. Nation’s Central Role in Nations Education

a. Indigenous families and communities have the right to retain shared responsibility for the upbringing, training, education and well-being of their children, consistent with the rights of the child, and Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control the systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.

b. Nations in British Columbia have control of, and decision-making responsibility for, Nation's education.

c. Nations have a central role in the education of their students, regardless of where they attend school.

d. Board policies and the learning environment will be respectful and will promote a greater understanding among staff and students of the local Nation’s history, language, territory, and contemporary matters.

2.2. Nation Students Access to Quality Education

a. ensure that they are confident in their self-identity, their families, their communities and traditional values, languages and cultures;

b. give them the skills they need to succeed in contemporary society, including 21st century technological skills; and

c. Inform and support them in order to access any opportunities they choose for higher learning, employment and life choices.

2.3. Reconciliation & Collaboration in Nation Education

a. The gap in educational outcomes between Nation Students and non-Nation students is a persisting legacy of colonialism, and concerted efforts and proactive measures are required to eliminate this gap and contribute to reconciliation in education.

b. The Parties have a shared interest and priority in supporting excellence in Nation education, including supporting Nation Students to fulfil their educational potential by having access to and receiving quality education that is respectful and reflective of their unique culture and history.

c. Strong, effective and inclusive educational systems provide a fundamental opportunity for building relationships and advancing reconciliation between the Crown and Nations, as expressed in the TRC’s Calls to Action, the UN Declaration and the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIPA).

d. Quality Nation education includes standards, programs, services, school supports and investments that provide appropriate tools and resources for Nation Student to ensure they have the skills and qualifications to succeed after graduation while addressing their unique needs.

e. Curriculum, materials and resources will meaningfully reflect the Nations’ culture, values, language and traditions, as approved and determined by the Nation or its designate.

f. LEAs are an important mechanism to facilitate relationship-building, from negotiation through to ongoing implementation.

g. The standards set by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples apply to Nation's education and particularly on indigenous children.

h. British Columbia has passed the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples which puts a legal obligation on the province to comply with the elements of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous people.

i. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action set out a framework for reconciliation, including with regard to Nation's education, that must inform the relationships and collaboration between Nations, the Province and boards of education.

2.4. Parental Support

a. Parents have the right to make an educated opinion on where their children will be enrolled to receive the benefit of an education program.

b. Parents will receive regular and ongoing support and information about their Childs progress in a safe way, being aware and understanding of multi-generational trauma.

2.5. Nation Student Safety

a. Nation Students have a right to feel safe at school, including safety from racism (students and staff), indifference, bias, marginalization, bullying and stereotyping, and the School District has an obligation to keep them safe.

b. Nation Students should not be separated from their peers based on their race or culture as this inevitably causes marginalization and bullying.

2.6. Shared Accountability and Data-Sharing

a. LEAs are more than a mere financial transaction and serve as a core shared accountability mechanism for both Nations and boards of education regarding Nation's education in the BC Public Schools.

b. Timely and relevant data is required to inform decision-making to support Nation Students.

c. This agreement will be reviewed by both parties on a regular basis for updates as needed.

3. RESPONSIBILITIES & COMMITMENTS

3.1. The Board agrees to:

a. Ensure that Nation Students have equitable access to educational programs, including Indigenous language instruction in coordination with the Nation, in the School District, and to continue to strive towards high levels of Nation Student success in educational programs;

b. Provide educational resource materials that promote an understanding of and appreciation for the history, language and culture of Nations people in British Columbia, including required curriculum on the residential school experience and ensuring mental health supports are provided for all students when these topics are addressed;

c. Promote the offering of, and enrollment in, English First Peoples 10, 11 and 12 and BC First Peoples 12 and Contemporary Indigenous Studies 12, or any successor courses for all students;

d. In collaboration with the Nation, promote the offering of and enrollment in Indigenous Language courses in line with the Minister’s mandate to develop new Nations history curriculum, develop full-course offerings in Indigenous languages and to implement the educational Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which includes taking the necessary steps for program development, teacher training, professional development, and appropriate consultation with the Nation and Indigenous language learning educators and experts, and provide an annual report of the progress of this mandate;

e. Promote and support effective professional development for school staff focused on Nation's history, language and culture including collaborating with the Nation to have one workshop per year that is indigenous focused;

f. Ensure Schools support Nation Students to participate in extracurricular and sports activities;

g. Ensure teachers provide information to Parents regarding their child’s educational program, and make every effort to ensure the Parents/s understand the meaning of this information (e.g., course selection process, reporting periods, report cards, as required by the School Act);

h. Communicate details of this Agreement, including its purpose, objectives and principles, with school personnel, in particular principals and teachers;

i. Communicate a detailed summary to the Nation of the Board’s spending of Targeted Indigenous Education Funding on Indigenous Education Programs and Services as identified through the direct involvement Indigenous communities working with the Board to support the success of Indigenous Students;

j. Provide an annual contract, the amount to be specified in each annual contract, for the hiring of a:

(1) Malahat Nation Education Liaison for the purpose of school liaison as specified in the annual contracts;

k. In coordination with educating Parents about the implications of providing consent to share information and their ability to appoint a representative to act on their behalf;

l. In coordination with the Nation, having regular meetings between Parents, teachers and/or students in a location that acknowledges the historic trauma of residential schools;

m. Work with the Nation to develop and implement an attendance protocol and keep Nation Students in school;

n. In the case of an Early School Leaver, work with the Parents and the Nation to collaborate on a plan that best meets the educational needs for that Nation Student;

o. Promote and support Nation cultural activities, including Indigenous People’s Day activities, in Schools within the School District; and

p. Collaborate with the Nation on how to effectively use the Targeted Indigenous Education Funding, including any surpluses, to support Nation Student needs and improved learning outcomes.

3.2. The Nation agrees to:

a. Promote the active participation and involvement of Parents and other community members of the Nation in the education of their children, including any available processes or forums in the School District (such as parent clubs and other committee processes) and School District or School activities;

b. In coordination with the Board, educate Parents about the implications of providing consent to share information and their ability to appoint a representative to act on their behalf;

c. Provide support for Parents and family to increase student attendance and participation;

d. Encourage and support Nation Students to participate in extracurricular and sports activities;

e. Subject to receiving Tuition Funding from Indigenous Services, pay the Board the Tuition Fees received from the federal government as agreed to and set out in this Agreement;

f. Provide space and opportunity on Nation lands for Parents, teachers, and/or students to meet in a way that acknowledges the historic trauma of residential schools. This can be used for opportunities such as but not limited to, Parent/teacher meetings, Report Card Review, student transitions, and professional development; and

g. Actively involve, support, and ensure an awareness of this agreement, its deliverables, and responsibilities to Nation Staff and Parents.

3.3. Wherever this Agreement provides that a School will perform any obligation under this Agreement, the Board will provide direction to the superintendent, principals, teachers, and other school staff as needed to fulfil that commitment.

3.4. Both parties will communicate this agreement with parents, teachers, students and community to share the objectives and purpose of this agreement.

4. EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

4.1. The Parties agree to, individually, together, and with Schools, make best efforts to:

a. Introduce more culturally relevant educational resources and activities in ALL subject areas for ALL students, such as through Board/Authority Authorized courses, and for events, ceremonies, and programming that takes place at a School; and

b. Offer English First Peoples 10, 11 and 12, BC First Peoples 12 and Contemporary Indigenous Studies 12 and residential school's curriculum;

4.2. The Parties will, with the Nation providing leadership and direction, work together to:

a. Integrate First Peoples Principles of Learning, authentic Indigenous resources, diverse learning experiences for all students, including land based educational and traditional ecological knowledge.

b. address the history of the Indian residential school system through the development and implementation of curriculum, materials and resources, and through professional development opportunities, in a sensitive and appropriate manner (see §3.1(b) above).

4.3. The Parties will work in partnership to develop and implement Nation language programs.

4.4. With regard to intellectual property rights, the Parties acknowledge article 31 of UN Declaration:

a. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games and visual and performing arts. They also have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions. In conjunction with indigenous peoples, States shall take effective measures to recognize and protect the exercise of these rights.

4.5. Consistent with article 31 of UN Declaration, the Parties agree that:

a. the Nation retains any intellectual property and copyrights of any curriculum content developed in collaboration or cooperation with them regarding their Nations languages, cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions;

b. the use of such information is intended to be for instructional purposes only at a local level and for the school district’s staff’s professional development purposes; and

c. any other proposed or intended use requires written consent from the Nation.

5. EDUCATION PROGRESS

5.1. The Board and the Nation will support all the Nation’s students in their educational journey to develop the skills, knowledge, and aptitudes to achieve the Dogwood Diploma.

5.2. For greater clarity, the Board will ensure the intentional or unintentional streaming or marginalization of Nation Students is not tolerated and that each and every capable Nation Student is placed in an educational program that leads to graduation with a Dogwood Diploma and a full range of opportunities, such as training, post-secondary education and employment. This will be ensured with regular meetings as outlined in section 18 below.

5.3. The Board and the Nation will ensure Nation Students and their Parents are provided with information about the implications of a Dogwood Diploma, as compared with the Adult Dogwood Diploma and other school leaving certificates, to support informed decision-making by those Nation Students and Parents.

5.4. The Board and Nation will coordinate to ensure every student has a Personal Life Plan (PLP) that begins in kindergarten and is updated annually.

5.5. The Board, in direct collaboration with the Nation, will ensure there is appropriate and timely (i.e., early) counselling support for career and post-secondary education planning available to Nation Students and that Nation Students are educated on these available supports.

6. RECOGNITION AND ASSESSMENT OF NATION STUDENTS K-12 REQUIRING ADDITIONAL SUPPORTS AND SERVICES

6.1. The Board will ensure School(s) communicate and collaborate with the Nation and Parents to ensure appropriate and transparent ongoing informal assessments of Nation Students to identify those who may require more formal special education assessment.

6.2. In particular, the Board and the Nation will jointly review and determine the criteria and processes used for the identification of kindergarten Nation Students who may require assessment and additional supports or services, recognizing that early identification is necessary to promote student success, and, for a Nation Student who is identified as having a special need before entering a School, the Nation Student’s assessment and programming information will be requested immediately upon enrollment to permit appropriate and effective planning and implementation of relevant interventions.

6.3. In cases where a Nation Student is identified as likely having diverse abilities or a possible disability upon enrolment in kindergarten, or when transferring into a School at a later grade level, or when a Nation Student has an obvious disability that has not been previously assessed, the Board will ensure there is a timely intervention as described in Appendix B.

6.4. In cases where a Nation student has undergone an advanced assessment, such as a psychoeducational assessment, the results of the assessment and the plan to provide additional supports and services will be discussed with the Nation and Parents.

6.5. In cases where a Nation student has undergone an advanced assessment that determines an intellectual disability or diverse abilities the student, in coordination between the Nation and School, will receive supports and services to achieve post-graduation success, regardless of being on the Dogwood or Evergreen graduation pathway.

7. SPECIAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT

7.1. The Parties agree that special education assessment and placement of, or timetable changes or new timetables for, Nation Students will follow the School District referral process, and the Ministry of Education, Special Education Services: A Manual of Policies, Procedures and Guidelines, as amended from time to time.

7.2. For greater clarity:

a. Prior to the placement of a Nation Student in a special education program, an educational psychology assessment must be completed, with parental consent, that identifies the Nation Student as requiring supports and services;

b. Prior to diversion of a Nations Student from the Dogwood path, a psychoeducational assessment must immediately be completed, with the consent of a parent, and must identify the Nation Student as having an intellectual disability;

c. In the event a student is found to have an intellectual disability or diverse abilities, a plan for the student will be created establishing whether they will continue on the Dogwood path or to enter a new career development path which can support and lead into future employment;

d. The results of the assessment must be provided to and discussed with the Parent of that Nation Student, the school-based team, and Nation support staff as may be designated by the Nation Student’s Parent; and

e. In discussing these results with the Parent, it is essential that the parent be fully educated as to the implications of this decision.

8. SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMMING

8.1. As soon as practical after a Nation Student has been identified having diverse abilities or a disability:

a. Appropriate supports and services will be identified in order to ensure that the Nation Student obtains an education that is most appropriate for his or her needs, and in regular classroom environments as much as possible;

b. The assessment results and educational services to be provided to the Nation Student will be outlined in an Individual Education Plan (IEP), which must be completed with parent for the purpose of assisting school staff to provide supports and services for the Nation Student and educating the student on all possible supports available;

c. A Nation Student with diverse abilities or disabilities will take an active role in the design of their IEP to the maximum extent that their developmental level and ability permit;

d. The IEP will be structured to provide students with the opportunity to gain skills to ensure maximum success post-graduation;

e. A written report stating the reason for placement of the Nation Student, and the educational opportunities gained and lost by such placement, must be provided to the Parent and Nation support staff as may be designated by the Nation Student’s Parent;

f. In cases where the Parent appoints a delegate, the Parent and the delegate will receive a copy of the IEP; and

g. In the event that the Parent declines to be involved in the IEP process and does not choose to appoint a delegate, the Board will ensure that the BC Public School will make every effort to ensure that the Nation Student’s needs are fully met and will facilitate communication between the Student and the Nation.

8.2. In developing an IEP, standards for students with diverse abilities or disabilities will be developed with high and appropriate expectations for achievement, and Nation Students with IEPs will be expected to graduate with skills and abilities allowing them to continue on to postsecondary education or employment.

8.3. The Board will ensure the School(s) work with Parents and, with their consent, the Nation, to:

a. collaboratively identify any adaptations made to a Nation Student’s educational program;

b. ensure that any Modifications are made to a Nation Student’s educational program only when necessary and only when Adaptations have been tried and have proven insufficient to meet the Nation Student’s needs, and only with the Informed Consent in writing of the Nation Student’s Parent, or their designate; and

c. if a Nation Student has been put on a non-Diploma Evergreen Certificate path, ensure that the Nation Student’s program: is documented in an IEP; wherever possible, aligns as closely as possible with a graduation diploma program; and supports the acquisition of professional certifications and essential life skills (such as budgeting and pre-employment skills).

8.4. When requested, the Parent and, where appropriate and feasible, Nation Students will have every opportunity to meet with school staff about the IEP and the Nation Student's educational program within a reasonable timeframe, and no later than two weeks after the request has been made to school personnel.

8.5. The Board will ensure School(s) offer each Nation Student who has diverse abilities or disabilities opportunities for professional development (such as work experience or professional certifications) in accordance with the student’s IEP and provide notice to the relevant Malahat representatives of those opportunities.

8.6. Nation Student progress reports on their educational achievement in a special education program or on an Evergreen Certificate path must be provided to the Parent and Nation support staff as designated by the Nation Student’s Parent, according to the same student progress reporting schedule as followed by the School and, in any event, not less than at the end of each term during the placement.

8.7. The Parties will ensure that Parents are advised:

a. of their right to request a change to the placement of a Nation Student in a special education program or on an Evergreen Certificate path;

b. that if the Parent wishes to request a change in a placement decision, they may file such a request in accordance with applicable Board bylaws, policies and/or procedures; and

c. where the Parent files a request, the Parent may request, and receive, support in the process from the Nation.

8.8. The Parties agree that IEPs are not intended to be static and will be reviewed and revisited at least bi-annually in collaboration with the Nation Student and his or her Parent, and the IEP will be either:

a. Updated;

b. Revised; or

c. Concluded, where it is determined that the Nation Student no longer requires an IEP.

8.9. For greater certainty, the Parties agree that an IEP will only be put in place under sections 8.1 and 8.2 and it will only be updated, revised or concluded under section 8.8 where the prior Informed Consent of the Parent has been obtained.

8.10. The Parties agree that, in the case of all special education categories that are consistent, individual education plans for Nation Students with special needs will be recognized and used as part of the planning process when those Nation Students transition between Nations Schools and Schools.

9. VULNERABLE STUDENT PLACEMENT

9.1. The Board will ensure that School(s) work with Parents and the Nation to identify Vulnerable Students and, where identification of a Nation Student as a Vulnerable Student is supported by evidence and demonstrated need, that an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) will be created with parental consent and involvement, and regularly reviewed, for that Nation Student.

10. CHILDREN IN CARE

10.1. The Board will ensure appropriate learning plans and supports are identified and provided for Children in Care.

10.2. The Board will ensure there is a designated contact at each school as the primary point of contact for Children in Care at their respective schools.

10.3. The Nation will ensure that a case manager is assigned to all Children in Care who will follow, track, and coordinate communications with social workers, care givers, school personnel, and the Board on a regular basis.

10.4. The Parties will work with supporting agencies, specifically Kw’umut Lelum, to ensure necessary supports are implemented to assist Nations Students who are Children in Care. This should include regular meetings between all involved Parties.

11. STUDENT CONDUCT

11.1. Expectations for nation student conduct shall be in accordance with the School Act and Regulations, the code of conduct for each school as approved by the Board, and the appeals bylaws, policies and/or procedures of the board, with direct consultation occurring with the Nation.

11.2. With written consent of a Nation Student’s Parent, the Board will notify the Nation of disciplinary action and potential escalation of disciplinary action in relation to that Nation Student, and provide to the Nation a copy of all correspondence related to the discipline of a Nation Student by the School administrator.

11.3. The Board will direct Schools to take a team approach with Nation Education representatives when dealing with general disciplinary issues involving Nation Students. These will include at the bare minimum the offering of mental health supports for the student(s) involved and immediate notice to the Parents and, with their consent, the Nation, when discipline has occurred.

11.4. When dealing with escalating disciplinary action, the board will reach out to the Nation’s Education department, with permission from the parent, to work together to ensure any disciplinary action is supportive of the student's success.

12. STUDENT SAFETY

12.1. The Board will share with the Nation relevant policies, schools’ code of conduct, and other appropriate measures to create a safe learning environment, including safety from racism (including students, student’s families, and staff), discrimination, indifference, bias, marginalization, bullying and stereotyping for all students attending the School(s). Upon request by either party, the Parties will meet to work to revise these policies in the best interests of Nation children.

12.2. Programming will be offered to all children to avoid marginalization and separation based on race. Indigenous programming will be offered as a part of the standard curriculum for all students and Malahat students will be fully included in the broader curriculum rather than separated.

13. CULTURAL AWARENESS & HIRING IN THE SCHOOL DISTRICT

13.1. The Board, in cooperation with the Nation, agrees to promote a greater awareness and inclusion of and respect by all School District staff and contractors for the Nation’s unique language, culture and history through its policies, practices, plans, curriculum and instruction. The Board will provide annual updates on the progress of this endeavor.

13.2. As per the BC Tripartite Education Agreement, at least one non-instructional day per year will be focused on enhancing Nations Students outcomes commencing on the year this document is signed. This will be structured after consultation and cooperation with the Nation.

13.3. The Board will ensure that the Nation has an opportunity to be meaningfully involved in the School District’s recruitment and hiring process for personnel, and in particular those positions that have a significant impact on the Nation Students, including, Nations Support Workers, Indigenous District Principals, Indigenous Education Coordinators, classroom teachers, principals and vice-principals.

14. TRANSPORTATION

14.1. In order to access Nations Transportation Fund, the Parties will identify Nations Students’ transportation needs and jointly develop and submit annually to the tripartite Nation Student Transportation Committee, a Joint Nation Student Transportation Plan setting out how the Parties will ensure Nation Students have reliable and safe transportation services to the relevant School, including contingency measures for unexpected circumstances.

14.2. The Board agrees that, once transportation services are implemented pursuant to an approved Joint Nation Student Transportation Plan with the Nation, the Board will not make changes to those services without written agreement of the Nation.

14.3. As per Schedule G of BCTEA, in the event that the Parties determine they need to revise their Joint Nation Student Transportation Plan, and that the revisions require further funding, they may submit a revised plan to tripartite Nations Student Transportation Committee.

14.4. Where the Parties make amendments to their Joint Nation Student Transportation Plan, or agree to changes in transportation services, they will ensure that Parents receive notice within a reasonable time in order to respond to any such changes.

14.5. The Board agrees that Nation Students will not be penalized and will be supported in the event of absences or late arrivals due to transportation challenges. The Board and Nation will collaborate to determine the reason for the student’s challenges and find a solution to prevent reoccurrence.

15. REPORTING

15.1. Periodic reports: The Board will provide to the Nation three times each year:

a. Attendance rates and updates

b. a summary of the number of Nation Students with IEPs placed in Modified or Adapted programs;

c. the number of Early School Leavers and information on supports implemented to prevent early leaving;

15.2. Annual Report: The Nation’s Education lead and the School District Principal of Indigenous Education will present a report to Chief and Council & the Board of Education which provides the following:

a. Progress of the implementation of the LEA – successes, challenges and anything else relevant to the success of the Agreement.

b. financial reports related to this Agreement, which are prepared by the Board in the regular course of its operation and which include a copy of the audited financial statements;

c. a complete financial report on the Targeted Indigenous Education Funding, Additional Funding and Special Education Funding, including ELL, which includes:

(1) the number of staff employed using Targeted Indigenous Education Funding, Additional Funding and Special Education Funding and designated to work with Nation Students;

(2) the proportion of the staff’s time spent working directly with Nation Students; and

(3) the staff’s duties and responsibilities;

d. measures of success of Nation Students through aggregate results for achievement including but not limited to the following:

(1) attendance rates;

(2) percentage of students who are on track or extending for reading, writing and numeracy in grades 4 and 7 in the Foundations Skills Assessment;

(3) participation rates for the Foundations Skills Assessments;

(4) grade to grade transition rates;

(5) student retention rates;

(6) graduation and six-year graduation rates distinguishing between Dogwood and Evergreen graduates;

(7) number of Nation Students eligible to move on to post-secondary education

(8) number of students identified having diverse abilities or disabilities

(9) proportion of students awarded a BC School Completion Certificate;

(10) Six-year completion (graduation) rate for students in an Alternate program;

(11) grades 10 to 12 math course participation rates,

(12) data related to assessments required for graduation purposes and other supports for successful transition to post-secondary education;

(13) number of Nation Students eligible to move on to post-secondary education;

(14) participation of extracurricular activities

(15) number of Nations’ Kindergarten students requiring extra supports

(16) courses and or programs offered that focus on Indigenous knowledge and cultures including professional development.

15.3. The Board and Nation will share two Nominal Roll student counts (September 30 & February 28) with the Ministry each School Year.

15.4. The Board will share with the Nation its annual report to the Ministry on the spending of all Nation Student Transportation Funding received and the amount of funding spent, which information should be clearly stated in the Board’s audited financial statements for their verification;

15.5. Subject to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, upon request, the Board will provide Nation community-specific student data to the Nation to help inform them about their Students’ progress, and to inform discussions between the Nation and the Board on supporting those Students.

16. COMMUNICATION

16.1. The Parties recognize the need for excellent communication and will establish agreed upon means for the successful and effective implementation of this Agreement, which may include, but not be limited to, regular meetings and contact through newsletters and other correspondence, as appropriate.

16.2. All notices and inquiries to the Nation from the District Schools should be sent to the official Nation education representative and Chief and Council so long as relevant parental consent has been acquired.

16.3. The Parties recognize the need for effective and ongoing communication with Parents in the support of their child’s successful education experience, and the Parties will advise Parents of opportunities for input and involvement in their child’s education, such as course selection dates, reporting periods, parent-teacher interviews, application deadlines and procedures for post-secondary education, etc.

16.4. The Parties will encourage functions and meetings, such as parent-teacher interviews, to be held in the community.

16.5. The LEA Working Group will meet once a month during the school year, while the education liaison will meet weekly with school representatives to review student progress.

16.6. The Parties agree to establish an annual graduation ceremony will occur including children graduating from preschool/daycare to Kindergarten, 7th to 8th grade and 12th grade.

17. TUITION PAYMENT

17.1. For eligible Nation Students on the Nominal Roll attending Schools operated by the Board on September 30th, and for whom the Nation has received Tuition Funding from Indigenous Services Canada, the Nation will pay to the Board the Tuition Fees amount in accordance with this Agreement.

17.2. The Board will not charge the Nation a greater amount for the Nation Students attending a School within the School District than the Nation Student Rate.

17.3. For greater certainty, the Parties agree that the Nation is responsible only for Tuition Funding received from Indigenous Services for the Tuition Fees of the Nation’s Students according to the approved Nations Student Rate and approved Nominal Roll. Unless otherwise agreed, the Nation will not be responsible for paying any amounts for which it does not receive funding from Indigenous Services, or which exceeds the Nation Student Rate.

17.4. The Parties agree the September 30th Nominal Roll enrolment will be verified by:

a. the Nation authorized representative

b. the Board authorized representative

17.5. The Parties agree that Tuition Fees payable for each School Year shall be paid by the Nation to the Board according to the following schedule and based upon the September 30th Nominal Roll figures:

a. 25% based on the previous year’s eligible Tuition Fees and Nominal Roll on or before September 30;

b. 25% based on the previous year’s eligible Tuition Fees and Nominal Roll on or before December 15.

c. 25% of the current year’s eligible Tuition Fees less (or, in addition to) the difference between the previous and current year’s eligible Tuition Fees on or before March 31;

d. 25% based on the current year’s eligible Tuition Fees and Nominal Roll on or before June 15.

17.6. In the event of a School closure due to a labour dispute, the Tuition Fees will be equitably adjusted by the agreement of the Parties and returned to the Nation for the benefit of the Nation’s students in the same manner as occurs with the Ministry of Education.

17.7. The Parties agree that Tuition Fees under this Agreement will be paid in installments as set out in section 17.5 herein with the following exceptions:

17.8. Withdrawals/Transfers:

a. a Nation Student has withdrawn from school during the month ending one month before the payment due date; or

b. a Nation Student has transferred to an indigenous School or a BC Independent School during the month ending one month before the payment due date, in which case, any further Tuition Fees for that Nation Student will be held by the Nation to be used for Tuition Fees to the Nation School or BC Independent School that the Nation Student has transferred to, or to support the continued education of the Nation Student in support of their potential re?entry into the public system, Nation School or BC Independent School in the future.

17.9. Early Leavers

a. If a student attends less than 50% of the school year, the Nation will retain $2,000.00 per student with a minimum amount of $5,000.00 to be placed in the Early Leaver Fund.

b. In the event there are 3 or more Early Leavers in a given year the LEA Oversight Team will convene analyze why this occurred and do everything in its power to prevent reoccurrence.

17.10. The Parties agree that additional services or programs not contemplated by this Agreement may be provided by the Board through agreement by the Parties on the terms and costs for such service(s) and/or program(s).

17.11. Where Indigenous Services Canada is late in providing Tuition Funding to the Nation:

a. the Nation will notify the Board of the delay in receiving ISC funding; and

b. the Board will not charge interest to the Nation on any amount that is outstanding due to Indigenous Services’ late provision of funding.

18. IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING, REVIEW

18.1. LEA OVERSIGHT TEAM: The Parties hereby establish a joint LEA Oversight Team responsible for ensuring the LEA serves its stated purpose with representation as follows:

a. Malahat Nation Chief and Council

b. Malahat Nation designated representatives

c. School District 79 designated representatives

d. Any other individuals approved by the Oversight Team to attend meetings.

18.2. The LEA Oversight Team will meet annually to review the report issued by the LEA Working Group.

18.3. The LEA Oversight Team will meet at either party’s request upon receiving reasonable notice.

18.4. LEA WORKING GROUP: The Parties hereby establish a joint LEA working group responsible for implementing this agreement and reporting the progress of this implementation to the Oversight Team.

18.5. The LEA Working Group will include Nation representatives, Board representatives, and representatives of the various schools.

18.6. The Parties agree to jointly develop terms of reference for the LEA Working Group within 20 days of the signing of this Agreement, which will become a Schedule to this Agreement, and which will include:

a. the roles and responsibilities of the LEA Working Group

b. a requirement that the LEA working group develop and finalize an LEA implementation plan for approval by the LEA Oversight Team within a specified timeframe and which, upon approval, will be appended to this Agreement;

c. A requirement that the LEA Working Group meet regularly and upon formal request by either party to this agreement.

d. A requirement the LEA Working Group prepare an annual report to present to the LEA Oversight Team including successes, challenges, and progress of the implementation along with relevant reporting from §15.

19. DISPUTE RESOLUTION

19.1. If there is a dispute between the Parties with respect to any matter arising from this Agreement or relating to the interpretation and application of this Agreement, the Parties agree to use their best efforts to resolve such disputes in a reasonable and timely manner and in good faith.

19.2. In the event that the dispute is still unresolved after the efforts described in §19.1, the parties agree that the following dispute resolution process will be used:

a. One party Must provide notice in writing to the other party indicating that it intends to use the dispute resolution process to resolve a dispute and includes details of the dispute at issue.

b. Within five (5) business days of the notice described in 19.2(b) being provided, or such further period agreed to by the parties in writing, representatives of each party with decision-making authority regarding the dispute will attempt to meet a final time to resolve the dispute.

c. If, within ten (10) business days after the meeting described in §18.2(b) has occurred or if either party refuses to participate, either party may refer the dispute to mediation by providing written notice to the other party of such referral.

d. The parties may jointly appoint a mutually acceptable mediator. If the parties are unable to agree upon the appointment of a mediator within ten (10) business days after the notice described in §18.2(c) the parties agree to apply to the Mediate BC Society or such other organization or person agreed to by the parties in writing, which will appoint a mediator while taking into account:

(1) The need for the mediator to be neutral and independent,

(2) The qualifications of the mediator,

(3) The mediator’s fees.

(4) The mediator's availability, and

(5) Any other consideration likely to result in the selection of an impartial, competent, and effective mediator.

e. The parties agree to participate in mediation in good faith to attempt to resolve the dispute between them.

f. The parties agree the mediation will be conducted with the assistance of the Mediate BC Society

g. Unless resolved through mediation, all disputes arising out of or in connection with this agreement, or in respect of any legal relationship therewith or derived therefrom, shall be referred to and finally resolved by arbitration administered by the British Columbia International Commercial Arbitration Centre pursuant to its rules.

h. The place of arbitration will be Victoria, BC.

i. The parties agree to share equally the costs and fees of the mediator and arbitrator engaged under this section to resolve disputes. Each party will be responsible for their own costs in preparation for and attending the mediation and arbitration.

20. TERM & AMENDMENT

20.1. The term of this Agreement will be _____ years, beginning July 1, 20___ and ending June 30, 20___, unless the Parties agree, in writing, to:

a. terminate the Agreement; or

b. renew the Agreement, with or without amendments.

20.2. Each Party may suggest improvements and amendments to this Agreement and both Parties agree to discuss such suggestions in good faith and come to a resolution as to the implementation of the suggested amendments.

21. NOTICES

21.1. Any notice, claim, consent, waiver, statement, or other documents or payment that either party may require or may desire to give, may be transmitted by mail, fax or personal delivery and will be conclusively deemed validly given or delivered or received by the addressee, if delivered personally on the date of delivery or, if mailed on the fifth business day after the mailing of the same in Canada by registered mail addressed or, if faxed with accompanying confirmation of completed transmission:

If to the Nation:

MALAHAT NATION

110 Thunder Road

Mill Bay BC

V0R2P4

If to the Board:

The Secretary-Treasurer

School District

“Address”

City

Postal Code

22. GENERAL

22.1. This Agreement will be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the laws in force in the Province of British Columbia.

22.2. This Agreement will be to the benefit of, and binding upon, the Parties hereto and their respective successors and assigns.

22.3. This Agreement supersedes any and all previous local education agreements between the Parties.

22.4. The Parties acknowledge that:

a. nothing in this Agreement, or in the negotiation of this Agreement, or in any prior document leading to this Agreement, in any way defines or amends, recognizes, affirms, or denies the existence of, or in any way limits Aboriginal/Indigenous or treaty rights of the Nation; and

b. this Agreement is without prejudice to the rights of the Parties and the Nation with respect to such matters.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF the Parties have executed this Agreement as of the date first above written.

SIGNED on behalf of the NATION by its duly authorized Officers

signature chief

in the presence of:

signature "Witness"

SIGNED on behalf of the BOARD OF EDUCATION

signature "Chairperson – Board of Trustees"

signature "Secretary Treasurer SD #___"

signature "Witness"

APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS

The following definitions apply to the Agreement:

"Adaptations" are teaching and assessment strategies especially designed to accommodate a student's needs so he or she can achieve the learning outcomes of the subject or course and to demonstrate mastery of concepts. Essentially, adaptations are "best practice" in teaching. A student working on learning outcomes of any grade or course level may be supported through use of adaptations.

"Adult Dogwood" means an adult high school diploma is the British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD) for adult learners (18 and older) who want to take courses in order to complete high school and obtain their adult high school diploma.

"Attendance Protocol" means an attendance procedure carried out at the schools in the District, which outlines the recording of attendance of students and the approach to excused and unexcused absences with the overall purpose of encouraging strong attendance necessary for success in schools.

"BC Public School" or "BC Public School(s)" means all public schools in British Columbia providing kindergarten to grade 12 education, but does not include BC Independent Schools or Nation Schools.

"Board/Authority Authorized Courses" are courses offered by BC Public Schools to respond to the local needs of the schools and their communities while providing choice and flexibility for students, according to requirements set by the Ministry of Education.

"Child in Care" means a Nation child for whom the Director of Child Welfare is the sole guardian, and the Public Guardian and Trustee manages the child's estate.

"Dogwood Certificate or Diploma" means the British Columbia Certificate of Graduation that is awarded by the Minister to a student upon successful completion of the provincial graduation requirements, as set out in the provincial Graduation Program and, for greater clarity, does not include an Adult Dogwood.

"Early Leaver Prevention Plan" means a plan of student supports, services or accommodations developed and implemented, where parental consent has been provided, in a manner consistent with the Attendance Protocol and with the purpose of re-engaging the Nation Student and re-establishing strong attendance. The Plan applies where a Nation Student misses more than 10% of scheduled classes in a month and will address academic, behavioral, attendance and any other relevant issues and will include interventions to be undertaken by the school, Nation and Parents.

"Early Leavers" means a student who has missed at least 50% of a term or semester.

"Early Leavers Fund" means a fund administered by the Nation pursuant to their Financial Administrative Law with input from the District that will be used exclusively for supporting re-entry and/or any and all alternative education options to give the student the best chance for success.

"Evergreen (School Completion) Certificate" is a school leaving certificate intended to celebrate success in learning that is not recognized in a Certificate of Graduation (Dogwood Diploma). It is used to recognize the accomplishments of students with special needs and an Individual Education Plan, who have met the goals of their education program, other than graduation (and not all students with special needs should be in an Evergreen Certificate Program.) The Evergreen Certificate is not a graduation credential; students who receive an Evergreen have not graduated. The Evergreen represents the completion of personal learning goals but does not represent graduation.

"Nation Student Rate" means the education costs for a Nation Student attending a BC Public School in a school district, as calculated annually by the Ministry in consultation with FNESC and Canada (formerly the "Nations Billing Rate").

"Nation Student" means a student who is ordinarily resident on a reserve of the Nation in British Columbia and is eligible to be on the Nominal Roll.

"Nation Transportation Fund" means the Nation Student Transportation Fund established by Canada, British Columbia and FNESC to fund the transportation of Nation Students to BC Public Schools, commencing in the 2019/20 School Year.

"Indigenous Services, IS, ISC or DISC" means the federal department of Indigenous Services.

"Individual Education Plan (IEP)" means a documented plan developed for a student that describes individualized goals, Adaptations, Modifications, and the services to be provided, and includes measures for tracking achievement, as required by the provincial Individual Education Plan Order M638/95 and addressed in the Ministry of Education Special Education Services: A Manual of Policies, Procedures and Guidelines (March 2011), as may be amended from time to time.

"Individual Learning Plan (ILP)" is an education plan developed by the School-Based Team for a student who does not meet the criteria for an IEP but is considered to be a Vulnerable Student.

"Informed Consent" refers to the provision of approval or assent, particularly and especially after thoughtful consideration, and after receiving all relevant information that is not unreasonably withheld. In the context of assessment and placement and education referrals, Informed Consent requires that the Parent/Guardian be informed of:

  • a. the assessment procedures to be carried out;
  • b. the information to be collected;
  • c. the intervention that may take place;
  • d. the likely benefits and risks; and
  • e. the option to refuse or withdraw at any time,

and be provided meaningful opportunity to provide input into the assessment and placement or education referral decision.

"Minister" means the Minister of Education (BC).

"Ministry" means the Ministry of Education (BC).

"Modifications" means instructional and assessment‐related decisions made to accommodate a student's educational needs that consist of individualized learning goals and outcomes which are different than learning outcomes of a course or subject. Modifications should be considered for those students whose special needs are such that they are unable to access the curriculum (i.e., students with limited awareness of their surroundings, students with fragile mental/physical health, students medically and cognitively/multiply challenged.)

"Nominal Roll" means the annual census of eligible students living on-reserve and attending elementary/secondary school as of September 30.

"Operating Grants Manual" means the provincial manual, as amended from time to time, that sets out the provincial funding formula that comprises a student basic allocation plus supplementary grants to determine school district allocations.

"Ordinarily resident on-reserve" means that the student usually lives at a civic address on reserve, is a child in joint custody who lives on reserve most of the time, or is staying on reserve and has no usual home elsewhere. Students continue to be considered ordinarily resident on reserve if they return to live on reserve with their parents, guardians or maintainers during the year, even if they live elsewhere while attending school or working at a summer job. (In this context, reserves are deemed to include all land set aside by the federal government for the use and occupancy of an Indian band, along with all other Crown lands which are recognized by Canada as settlement lands of the Indian band of which the student is a resident.

"Parent" means, in respect of a student:

  • a. the guardian of the person of the student;
  • b. the person legally entitled to custody of the student;
  • c. The parent's delegated representative; or
  • d. the person who usually has the care and control of the student.

"Personal Life Plan" means a document prepared in coordination with the student and his or her teachers beginning in kindergarten and updated annually describing likes, strengths, and anything else relevant to their potential development. From Grade K-3 the PLP will be updated by the student's teacher in coordination with the Education Liaison. From Grades 4-12 the document will be prepared in coordination with the student, culminating in an eventual career plan.

"School" or "School(s)" means and includes any school operated by the Board.

"School Act" means the British Columbia School Act, RSBC 1996, Chapter 412.

"School District" or "District" means the area constituted under the School Act as School District #____.

"School Year" means the period beginning on July 1 and ending on June 30 the following year.

"Targeted Indigenous Education Funding" means the funding provided to the School District by the Ministry of Education targetedfor school age students of Indigenous ancestry participating in Indigenous Education Programs and Services offered by public schools, which must be spent on the provision of these programs and services.

"Tuition Fees" means the Tuition Funding per student received from Indigenous Services by the Nation, which the Nation pays to the Board for the purchase of education services, including any mandatory School Fees, for students in the School District at the rate set out by the Ministry of Education in its fiscal framework for a given School Year.

"Tuition Funding" means the Tuition Funding received by the Nation from Indigenous Services Canada for the education of Nation Students in the School District who are on the Nominal Roll, which is invoiced for by the Board as per the Nation Student Rates established by the Ministry annually and as determined by the snapshot date of September 30th.

"Vulnerable Student" means a student who has been identified as finding learning more challenging based on the following factors: not meeting learning outcomes, significant absence from school, not transitioning to the next grade, failing courses, behavior issues, under suspension, not at grade level and/or is a child in care.

APPENDIX B – Assessment Protocol

APPENDIX C – Educational Liaison Job Description

19/20 Audited Financial Statements

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/finance/19-20-consolidated-financial-statements.pdf
Posted in Finance

19/20 Annual Report

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/council/2020-annual-report.pdf
Posted in Chief & Council

Financial Administration Law

In 2014 Malahat Nation implemented its Financial Administrative Law. The FAL is a set of governance and finance policies that helps Councils and staff make informed decisions. Malahat Nation lives by its FAL and is committed to good governance and financial practices. The policies and procedures set out in the FAL clarify expectations about our administrative responsibilities to Malahat Nation’s employees, members and other related persons;. A finance and Audit Committee has been established to make recommendations to Council on financial and investment decisions to promote positive financial outcomes.

There are four key areas Malahat FAL policies and procedures cover:

  • Governance
  • Information Management
  • Finance
  • Human Resources

Access to the FAL and all 30 policies is available below.

Financial Administration Law

SPP-01 Delegated and Assigned Responsibilities Policy

SPP-02 Policies, Procedures and Directions Policy

SPP-03 Reporting of Remuneration and Expenses Policy

SPP-04 Committee Establishment and Disbandment Policy

SPP-05 Finance and Audit Committee Policy

SPP-06 Appointment of First Nations Officers Policy

SPP-07 Organizational Chart Policy

SPP-08 Human Resources Records Management Policy

SPP-09 Hiring Policy

SPP-10 Progressive Disciplinary and Dismissal Policy

SPP-11 Employee Evaluation and Planning Policy

SPP-12 Code of Conduct

SPP-13 Annual Budget and Planning Policy

SPP-14 Financial Institution Account and Cash Management Policy

SPP-15 Expenditure Policy

SPP-16 Long-Term Debt Policy

SPP-17 Procurement Policy

SPP-18 Risk Management Policy

SPP-19 Loans Receivable, Gaurantees and Indemnities Policy

SPP-20 Investment Policy

SPP-21 Insurance Policy

SPP-22 Emergencies Policy

SPP-23 Financial and Operational Reporting Policy

SPP-24 Information Technology Policy

SPP-25 External Audit Policy

SPP-26 Records Management Policy

SPP-27 Tangible Capital Assets Policy

SPP-28 Financial Management System Improvement Policy

SPP-29 Reporting of Breaches and Financial Irregularities Policy

SPP-30 Information Privacy Policy

Cannabis Law

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/laws/cannabis-law-2019-09-26.pdf
Posted in Laws & Policies

Applying for a Status Card

For more detailed information, please see the official Government of Canada page.

If you require assistance, Cassandra Daniels is available to help you with this process. Please send her an email at cassandra.daniels@malahatnation.com to arrange a meeting.

Requirements:

  1. SCIS application
  2. Guarantor application
  3. One piece of valid photo ID
  4. Supporting documents if applicable
  5. Two identical passport photos

1. SCIS application

Download Application

Please note. Applications for the new SCIS card are available for pick up with our front desk clerk, Cassie.

2. Guarantor declaration

Download Declaration

It is very important that you have an approved guarantor.

The Guarantor for your application needs to sign the Guarantor application, photocopy of your ID and supporting documents if applicable- and one passport photo

3. One piece of photo ID

Acceptable valid identification includes:

  • Passport (an international passport is acceptable if it includes the name, date of birth, photo and signature of the applicant and is accompanied by a professionally translated version if not in French or English)
  • Driver’s license
  • enhanced driver’s license
  • Canadian military identification card
  • Government-issued identification card
  • Government-issued enhanced identification card
  • Health card
  • Canadian citizenship card (issued before February 1, 2012)
  • Canadian permanent resident card
  • U.S. permanent resident card (green card)

4. Supporting documents if applicable

5. Two identical passport photos

Or the SCIS photo app has been released at the Apple Store and Google Play- you can find it by searching “SCIS Photo”. There are a couple of things to note:

  • Anyone can download and use the app at no charge
  • It is for SCIS- only applications and requires several pieces of information including the applicant’s registration number. This means those applying for registration cannot use it yet
  • The app does not store personal information once it is submitted.
  • The app can be used to submit photos for more than one person.
  • The photos can be taken by another person or by the applicant as a selfie.
  • All rules about passport-style still apply- light background, no angles, no shadows, no glare, neutral facial expressions, ect.

For best results:

  • Use “selfie distance” if the photo is being taken by someone other than the applicant.
  • Tell the applicant about the location of the camera lens so that they make direct eye contact in the photos.
  • To avoid angles, hold the phone at the face height for the applicant.

Please be advised that the SCIS cards take anywhere from 6-10 weeks to process and be mailed to you.

Posted in Form Library

Post Secondary Application

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/forms/post-secondary-application.pdf
Posted in Form Library

Housing Application

https://malahatcdn.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/pdf/forms/housing-application.pdf
Posted in Form Library